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Bullying victimization, mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm among Australian high schoolchildren: Evidence from nationwide data.
Psychiatry Res. 2020 10; 292:113364.PR

Abstract

The effects of bullying on mental health among adolescents are of major public health concern, especially following modern bullying methods that technologically victimize adolescents. However, the independent effects of different forms of bullying (traditional, cyberbullying or both) on different types of mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm are not clear. Using a cross-sectional study design, involving 2166 Australian high schoolchildren (1131 Boys and 1035 Girls) aged 12-17 years, this study examined the associations of bullying victimization (traditional, cyber and both) with mental disorders, suicidality (ideation, plan and attempt) and self-harm. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess the associations. Victims of traditional bullying and cyberbullying incurred a significantly higher risk of major depressive disorder, suicidality and self-harm compared to those who had not encountered such threats. Findings also indicated the need for early identification of bullying victims to prevent the risk of mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm in schoolchildren. Furthermore, this evidence can be utilized to inform decisions regarding the provision of resources to address this important health issue in the context of any developed countries like Australia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Research and School of Commerce, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Darling Heights, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australia; Maternal and Child Health Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68, Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sarani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh. Electronic address: irteja.islam@icddrb.org.Centre for Health Research and School of Commerce, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Darling Heights, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australia.Centre for Health Research and School of Commerce, University of Southern Queensland, West Street, Darling Heights, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32771835

Citation

Islam, Md Irteja, et al. "Bullying Victimization, Mental Disorders, Suicidality and Self-harm Among Australian High Schoolchildren: Evidence From Nationwide Data." Psychiatry Research, vol. 292, 2020, p. 113364.
Islam MI, Khanam R, Kabir E. Bullying victimization, mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm among Australian high schoolchildren: Evidence from nationwide data. Psychiatry Res. 2020;292:113364.
Islam, M. I., Khanam, R., & Kabir, E. (2020). Bullying victimization, mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm among Australian high schoolchildren: Evidence from nationwide data. Psychiatry Research, 292, 113364. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.113364
Islam MI, Khanam R, Kabir E. Bullying Victimization, Mental Disorders, Suicidality and Self-harm Among Australian High Schoolchildren: Evidence From Nationwide Data. Psychiatry Res. 2020;292:113364. PubMed PMID: 32771835.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bullying victimization, mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm among Australian high schoolchildren: Evidence from nationwide data. AU - Islam,Md Irteja, AU - Khanam,Rasheda, AU - Kabir,Enamul, Y1 - 2020/08/03/ PY - 2020/02/16/received PY - 2020/07/27/revised PY - 2020/08/02/accepted PY - 2020/8/11/pubmed PY - 2021/1/6/medline PY - 2020/8/11/entrez KW - ADHD KW - Anxiety disorder KW - Conduct disorder KW - Cyberbullying KW - Major depressive disorder KW - Mental disorder KW - Schoolchildren KW - Self-harm KW - Suicidality KW - Traditional bullying SP - 113364 EP - 113364 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 292 N2 - The effects of bullying on mental health among adolescents are of major public health concern, especially following modern bullying methods that technologically victimize adolescents. However, the independent effects of different forms of bullying (traditional, cyberbullying or both) on different types of mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm are not clear. Using a cross-sectional study design, involving 2166 Australian high schoolchildren (1131 Boys and 1035 Girls) aged 12-17 years, this study examined the associations of bullying victimization (traditional, cyber and both) with mental disorders, suicidality (ideation, plan and attempt) and self-harm. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess the associations. Victims of traditional bullying and cyberbullying incurred a significantly higher risk of major depressive disorder, suicidality and self-harm compared to those who had not encountered such threats. Findings also indicated the need for early identification of bullying victims to prevent the risk of mental disorders, suicidality and self-harm in schoolchildren. Furthermore, this evidence can be utilized to inform decisions regarding the provision of resources to address this important health issue in the context of any developed countries like Australia. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32771835/Bullying_victimization_mental_disorders_suicidality_and_self_harm_among_Australian_high_schoolchildren:_Evidence_from_nationwide_data_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-1781(20)30320-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -