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Co-occurrence of Dating Violence Victimization Subtypes: Assessing the Influence of Family Factors, Dating Attitudes, Risky Behaviors, and the Moderating Effect of Gender Among School-Aged Teens.
Violence Vict. 2020 08 01; 35(4):467-502.VV

Abstract

Using data from a nationally representative sample of school-aged teens (n = 795), this study examined covariates associated with three subtypes of dating violence victimization (physical violence, emotional abuse, and imposed isolation). We asked the research questions: What were the family factors, dating attitudes, and risky behaviors associated with three subtypes of dating violence victimization across two time points? Second, were these relationships moderated by gender? Overall, we found widespread co-occurrence of victimization. Contrary to our predictions, not all earlier experiences with dating violence victimization worsened or persisted overtime. Regarding family factors, we did not find substantial statistically significant effects on victimization, with the exception that greater openness with parents was associated with increased occurrence of emotional abuse at Wave 1. In terms of dating attitudes, we found that when respondents condoned violence against a girlfriend, they were more likely to experience physical violence victimization at both waves. Respondents who believed that it is okay to use violence to control a boyfriend's behavior were more likely to report emotional abuse at Wave 1. Similarly, respondents who believed that it is okay to date more than one person, as well as those who condoned sexual intercourse outside of a romantic relationship, were more susceptible to emotional abuse. Regarding risky behaviors, we found that the respondents' victimization experience did not increase with a greater sexual partner acquisition; rather, it exerted the opposite effect on their experience with physical violence victimization. These risky behaviors, however, were only statistically significant at Wave 1. Finally, the moderating effect of gender is noted in the study. Implications from the study are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Work, The University of Texas, El Paso, Texas ypaat@utep.edu.School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32788333

Citation

Paat, Yok-Fong, et al. "Co-occurrence of Dating Violence Victimization Subtypes: Assessing the Influence of Family Factors, Dating Attitudes, Risky Behaviors, and the Moderating Effect of Gender Among School-Aged Teens." Violence and Victims, vol. 35, no. 4, 2020, pp. 467-502.
Paat YF, Markham C, Peskin M. Co-occurrence of Dating Violence Victimization Subtypes: Assessing the Influence of Family Factors, Dating Attitudes, Risky Behaviors, and the Moderating Effect of Gender Among School-Aged Teens. Violence Vict. 2020;35(4):467-502.
Paat, Y. F., Markham, C., & Peskin, M. (2020). Co-occurrence of Dating Violence Victimization Subtypes: Assessing the Influence of Family Factors, Dating Attitudes, Risky Behaviors, and the Moderating Effect of Gender Among School-Aged Teens. Violence and Victims, 35(4), 467-502. https://doi.org/10.1891/VV-D-18-00159
Paat YF, Markham C, Peskin M. Co-occurrence of Dating Violence Victimization Subtypes: Assessing the Influence of Family Factors, Dating Attitudes, Risky Behaviors, and the Moderating Effect of Gender Among School-Aged Teens. Violence Vict. 2020 08 1;35(4):467-502. PubMed PMID: 32788333.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Co-occurrence of Dating Violence Victimization Subtypes: Assessing the Influence of Family Factors, Dating Attitudes, Risky Behaviors, and the Moderating Effect of Gender Among School-Aged Teens. AU - Paat,Yok-Fong, AU - Markham,Christine, AU - Peskin,Melissa, PY - 2020/8/14/entrez PY - 2020/8/14/pubmed PY - 2021/6/10/medline KW - dating attitudes KW - family factors KW - risky behaviors KW - school-aged teens KW - teen dating violence SP - 467 EP - 502 JF - Violence and victims JO - Violence Vict VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - Using data from a nationally representative sample of school-aged teens (n = 795), this study examined covariates associated with three subtypes of dating violence victimization (physical violence, emotional abuse, and imposed isolation). We asked the research questions: What were the family factors, dating attitudes, and risky behaviors associated with three subtypes of dating violence victimization across two time points? Second, were these relationships moderated by gender? Overall, we found widespread co-occurrence of victimization. Contrary to our predictions, not all earlier experiences with dating violence victimization worsened or persisted overtime. Regarding family factors, we did not find substantial statistically significant effects on victimization, with the exception that greater openness with parents was associated with increased occurrence of emotional abuse at Wave 1. In terms of dating attitudes, we found that when respondents condoned violence against a girlfriend, they were more likely to experience physical violence victimization at both waves. Respondents who believed that it is okay to use violence to control a boyfriend's behavior were more likely to report emotional abuse at Wave 1. Similarly, respondents who believed that it is okay to date more than one person, as well as those who condoned sexual intercourse outside of a romantic relationship, were more susceptible to emotional abuse. Regarding risky behaviors, we found that the respondents' victimization experience did not increase with a greater sexual partner acquisition; rather, it exerted the opposite effect on their experience with physical violence victimization. These risky behaviors, however, were only statistically significant at Wave 1. Finally, the moderating effect of gender is noted in the study. Implications from the study are discussed. SN - 0886-6708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32788333/Co_occurrence_of_Dating_Violence_Victimization_Subtypes:_Assessing_the_Influence_of_Family_Factors_Dating_Attitudes_Risky_Behaviors_and_the_Moderating_Effect_of_Gender_Among_School_Aged_Teens_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1891/VV-D-18-00159 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -