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Covariation between Childhood-Trauma Related Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Affective Temperaments is Impaired in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder.
Neuroscience. 2021 01 15; 453:102-112.N

Abstract

Affective temperaments and childhood-trauma experiences are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). So far, how the covariation between distinct affective temperaments and childhood-trauma insulted brain functional connectivities (FCs) contribute to MDD remains unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate whether certain brain FC patterns are related to certain affective temperaments and whether the FCs contribute to depressive symptom dimensions of MDD patients. Twenty-nine medication-free MDD patients and 58 healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning and completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF), and the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS). Two multivariate analyses of partial least squares (PLS) regression were used to explore the associations among childhood-trauma related resting-state FCs, affective temperaments and depressive symptom dimensions. In all participants, a linear combination of 81 FCs (involving parahippocampus, amygdala, cingulate cortex, insula, frontal-temporal-parietal-occipital cortex, pallidum, and cerebellum) were associated with a linear combination of increased depressive, irritable, anxious, and cyclothymic temperaments. Moreover, the covariation between the PLS FC profile and the PLS affective-temperament profile were enhanced in the MDD patients compared to healthy controls. In MDD participants alone, the affective-temperament modulated FC profile (mainly of the lingual and temporal cortex) was associated with the somatization symptom dimension when age, sex, ill-duration, age-of-onset, and HARS scores were adjusted. The findings imply possible neural correlates of affective temperaments and may find applications in intervention of the somatization-depression symptoms by stimulation of the related neural correlates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China; Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Translational Medicine of Mental Disorders, Guangzhou 510370, China.School of Nursing, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100091, China.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China; Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Translational Medicine of Mental Disorders, Guangzhou 510370, China.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China; Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Translational Medicine of Mental Disorders, Guangzhou 510370, China.Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 625014, China.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China; The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410011, China.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China; Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Translational Medicine of Mental Disorders, Guangzhou 510370, China.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China; Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Translational Medicine of Mental Disorders, Guangzhou 510370, China. Electronic address: brainzheng@163.com.The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou 510370, China. Electronic address: shenglinshe@gzhmu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32795554

Citation

Wu, Huawang, et al. "Covariation Between Childhood-Trauma Related Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Affective Temperaments Is Impaired in Individuals With Major Depressive Disorder." Neuroscience, vol. 453, 2021, pp. 102-112.
Wu H, Wu C, Wu F, et al. Covariation between Childhood-Trauma Related Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Affective Temperaments is Impaired in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder. Neuroscience. 2021;453:102-112.
Wu, H., Wu, C., Wu, F., Zhan, Q., Peng, H., Wang, J., Zhao, J., Ning, Y., Zheng, Y., & She, S. (2021). Covariation between Childhood-Trauma Related Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Affective Temperaments is Impaired in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder. Neuroscience, 453, 102-112. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2020.08.002
Wu H, et al. Covariation Between Childhood-Trauma Related Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Affective Temperaments Is Impaired in Individuals With Major Depressive Disorder. Neuroscience. 2021 01 15;453:102-112. PubMed PMID: 32795554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Covariation between Childhood-Trauma Related Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Affective Temperaments is Impaired in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder. AU - Wu,Huawang, AU - Wu,Chao, AU - Wu,Fengchun, AU - Zhan,Qianqian, AU - Peng,Hongjun, AU - Wang,Jiaojian, AU - Zhao,Jingping, AU - Ning,Yuping, AU - Zheng,Yingjun, AU - She,Shenglin, Y1 - 2020/08/11/ PY - 2019/11/28/received PY - 2020/06/25/revised PY - 2020/08/03/accepted PY - 2020/8/17/pubmed PY - 2021/5/15/medline PY - 2020/8/16/entrez KW - affective temperaments KW - childhood trauma KW - major depressive disorder KW - partial least squares KW - resting-state functional connectivity KW - somatization SP - 102 EP - 112 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 453 N2 - Affective temperaments and childhood-trauma experiences are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). So far, how the covariation between distinct affective temperaments and childhood-trauma insulted brain functional connectivities (FCs) contribute to MDD remains unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate whether certain brain FC patterns are related to certain affective temperaments and whether the FCs contribute to depressive symptom dimensions of MDD patients. Twenty-nine medication-free MDD patients and 58 healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning and completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF), and the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS). Two multivariate analyses of partial least squares (PLS) regression were used to explore the associations among childhood-trauma related resting-state FCs, affective temperaments and depressive symptom dimensions. In all participants, a linear combination of 81 FCs (involving parahippocampus, amygdala, cingulate cortex, insula, frontal-temporal-parietal-occipital cortex, pallidum, and cerebellum) were associated with a linear combination of increased depressive, irritable, anxious, and cyclothymic temperaments. Moreover, the covariation between the PLS FC profile and the PLS affective-temperament profile were enhanced in the MDD patients compared to healthy controls. In MDD participants alone, the affective-temperament modulated FC profile (mainly of the lingual and temporal cortex) was associated with the somatization symptom dimension when age, sex, ill-duration, age-of-onset, and HARS scores were adjusted. The findings imply possible neural correlates of affective temperaments and may find applications in intervention of the somatization-depression symptoms by stimulation of the related neural correlates. SN - 1873-7544 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32795554/Covariation_between_Childhood_Trauma_Related_Resting_State_Functional_Connectivity_and_Affective_Temperaments_is_Impaired_in_Individuals_with_Major_Depressive_Disorder_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(20)30506-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -