Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Heterogeneous antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain and nucleocapsid with implications for COVID-19 immunity.
JCI Insight. 2020 09 17; 5(18)JI

Abstract

Evaluation of potential immunity against the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus that emerged in 2019 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential for health, as well as social and economic recovery. Generation of antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 (seroconversion) may inform on acquired immunity from prior exposure, and antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection. Some serology assays rely solely on SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N-protein) as the antibody detection antigen; however, whether such immune responses correlate with S-RBD response and COVID-19 immunity remains unknown. Here, we generated a quantitative serological ELISA using recombinant S-RBD and N-protein for the detection of circulating antibodies in 138 serial serum samples from 30 reverse transcription PCR-confirmed, SARS-CoV-2-hospitalized patients, as well as 464 healthy and non-COVID-19 serum samples that were collected between June 2017 and June 2020. Quantitative detection of IgG antibodies against the 2 different viral proteins showed a moderate correlation. Antibodies against N-protein were detected at a rate of 3.6% in healthy and non-COVID-19 sera collected during the pandemic in 2020, whereas 1.9% of these sera were positive for S-RBD. Approximately 86% of individuals positive for S-RBD-binding antibodies exhibited neutralizing capacity, but only 74% of N-protein-positive individuals exhibited neutralizing capacity. Collectively, our studies show that detection of N-protein-binding antibodies does not always correlate with presence of S-RBD-neutralizing antibodies and caution against the extensive use of N-protein-based serology testing for determination of potential COVID-19 immunity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, and.The Fetal Center, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Texas McGovern Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.Department of Immunology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.Metastasis Research Center, Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA. Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32796155

Citation

McAndrews, Kathleen M., et al. "Heterogeneous Antibodies Against SARS-CoV-2 Spike Receptor Binding Domain and Nucleocapsid With Implications for COVID-19 Immunity." JCI Insight, vol. 5, no. 18, 2020.
McAndrews KM, Dowlatshahi DP, Dai J, et al. Heterogeneous antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain and nucleocapsid with implications for COVID-19 immunity. JCI Insight. 2020;5(18).
McAndrews, K. M., Dowlatshahi, D. P., Dai, J., Becker, L. M., Hensel, J., Snowden, L. M., Leveille, J. M., Brunner, M. R., Holden, K. W., Hopkins, N. S., Harris, A. M., Kumpati, J., Whitt, M. A., Lee, J. J., Ostrosky-Zeichner, L. L., Papanna, R., LeBleu, V. S., Allison, J. P., & Kalluri, R. (2020). Heterogeneous antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain and nucleocapsid with implications for COVID-19 immunity. JCI Insight, 5(18). https://doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.142386
McAndrews KM, et al. Heterogeneous Antibodies Against SARS-CoV-2 Spike Receptor Binding Domain and Nucleocapsid With Implications for COVID-19 Immunity. JCI Insight. 2020 09 17;5(18) PubMed PMID: 32796155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heterogeneous antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain and nucleocapsid with implications for COVID-19 immunity. AU - McAndrews,Kathleen M, AU - Dowlatshahi,Dara P, AU - Dai,Jianli, AU - Becker,Lisa M, AU - Hensel,Janine, AU - Snowden,Laura M, AU - Leveille,Jennifer M, AU - Brunner,Michael R, AU - Holden,Kylie W, AU - Hopkins,Nikolas S, AU - Harris,Alexandria M, AU - Kumpati,Jerusha, AU - Whitt,Michael A, AU - Lee,J Jack, AU - Ostrosky-Zeichner,Luis L, AU - Papanna,Ramesha, AU - LeBleu,Valerie S, AU - Allison,James P, AU - Kalluri,Raghu, Y1 - 2020/09/17/ PY - 2020/07/17/received PY - 2020/08/13/accepted PY - 2020/8/17/pubmed PY - 2020/9/30/medline PY - 2020/8/16/entrez KW - Adaptive immunity KW - COVID-19 KW - Immunology JF - JCI insight JO - JCI Insight VL - 5 IS - 18 N2 - Evaluation of potential immunity against the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus that emerged in 2019 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential for health, as well as social and economic recovery. Generation of antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 (seroconversion) may inform on acquired immunity from prior exposure, and antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection. Some serology assays rely solely on SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N-protein) as the antibody detection antigen; however, whether such immune responses correlate with S-RBD response and COVID-19 immunity remains unknown. Here, we generated a quantitative serological ELISA using recombinant S-RBD and N-protein for the detection of circulating antibodies in 138 serial serum samples from 30 reverse transcription PCR-confirmed, SARS-CoV-2-hospitalized patients, as well as 464 healthy and non-COVID-19 serum samples that were collected between June 2017 and June 2020. Quantitative detection of IgG antibodies against the 2 different viral proteins showed a moderate correlation. Antibodies against N-protein were detected at a rate of 3.6% in healthy and non-COVID-19 sera collected during the pandemic in 2020, whereas 1.9% of these sera were positive for S-RBD. Approximately 86% of individuals positive for S-RBD-binding antibodies exhibited neutralizing capacity, but only 74% of N-protein-positive individuals exhibited neutralizing capacity. Collectively, our studies show that detection of N-protein-binding antibodies does not always correlate with presence of S-RBD-neutralizing antibodies and caution against the extensive use of N-protein-based serology testing for determination of potential COVID-19 immunity. SN - 2379-3708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32796155/Heterogeneous_antibodies_against_SARS_CoV_2_spike_receptor_binding_domain_and_nucleocapsid_with_implications_for_COVID_19_immunity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.142386 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -