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The hangover hypothesis and the influence of moderate social drinking on mental ability.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1988; 12(1):25-9AC

Abstract

The "hangover" hypothesis proposes that there is some residual effect of low to moderate alcohol intake on the nervous system after the blood alcohol level has returned to zero. This notion has been invoked to explain the putative effects of moderate alcohol consumption on mental ability. We evaluated the hangover hypothesis by attempting to predict cognitive performance from self-reports of alcohol consumed during the week prior to testing. We found no meaningful evidence to support the notion that moderate alcohol ingestion produces a measurable toxic effect on brain function after the period of acute intoxication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3279856

Citation

Bowden, S C., et al. "The Hangover Hypothesis and the Influence of Moderate Social Drinking On Mental Ability." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 12, no. 1, 1988, pp. 25-9.
Bowden SC, Walton NH, Walsh KW. The hangover hypothesis and the influence of moderate social drinking on mental ability. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1988;12(1):25-9.
Bowden, S. C., Walton, N. H., & Walsh, K. W. (1988). The hangover hypothesis and the influence of moderate social drinking on mental ability. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 12(1), pp. 25-9.
Bowden SC, Walton NH, Walsh KW. The Hangover Hypothesis and the Influence of Moderate Social Drinking On Mental Ability. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1988;12(1):25-9. PubMed PMID: 3279856.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The hangover hypothesis and the influence of moderate social drinking on mental ability. AU - Bowden,S C, AU - Walton,N H, AU - Walsh,K W, PY - 1988/2/1/pubmed PY - 1988/2/1/medline PY - 1988/2/1/entrez SP - 25 EP - 9 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - The "hangover" hypothesis proposes that there is some residual effect of low to moderate alcohol intake on the nervous system after the blood alcohol level has returned to zero. This notion has been invoked to explain the putative effects of moderate alcohol consumption on mental ability. We evaluated the hangover hypothesis by attempting to predict cognitive performance from self-reports of alcohol consumed during the week prior to testing. We found no meaningful evidence to support the notion that moderate alcohol ingestion produces a measurable toxic effect on brain function after the period of acute intoxication. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3279856/The_hangover_hypothesis_and_the_influence_of_moderate_social_drinking_on_mental_ability_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=1988&volume=12&issue=1&spage=25 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -