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Acupuncture for the Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2020; 2020:7509481.EB

Abstract

Background

Postcholecystectomy syndrome (PCS) has become a common postoperative syndrome that requires systematic and comprehensive therapy to achieve adequate clinical control. Acupuncture and related therapies have shown clinical effects for PCS in many studies. However, systematic reviews/meta-analyses (SRs/MAs) for them are lacking.

Objective

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of PCS using randomized controlled trials (RCTs).

Methods

Potentially eligible studies were searched in the following electronic databases up to 1 February 2020: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science (WoS), Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), WanFang Database (WF), and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP)), and other sources (WHO ICTRP, ChiCTR, Clinical Trials, and Grey Literature Database). The RevMan 5.3 was employed for analyses. The Cochrane Collaboration' risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias (ROB). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the quality of the evidence.

Results

A total of 14 RCTs with 1593 participants were included in this SR. MA showed that acupuncture in combination with conventional medicine (CM) did not show statistical differences in reduction in pain. However, acupuncture in combination with CM significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and improved gastrointestinal function recovery compared to the CM group. Acupuncture combined with traditional Chinese medicine and CM, and acupuncture as monotherapy may improve gastrointestinal function recovery with acceptable adverse events.

Conclusion

Acupuncture may be an effective and safe treatment for PCS. However, this study lacks conclusive evidence due to poor quality evidence, limited data, and clinical heterogeneity of acupuncture methods in the included studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.School of Acu-Mox and Tuina, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China. Acupuncture Clinical Research Center of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32802133

Citation

Yin, Zihan, et al. "Acupuncture for the Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM, vol. 2020, 2020, p. 7509481.
Yin Z, Xiao Q, Xu G, et al. Acupuncture for the Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM. 2020;2020:7509481.
Yin, Z., Xiao, Q., Xu, G., Cheng, Y., Yang, H., Zhou, J., Fu, Y., Chen, J., Zhao, L., & Liang, F. (2020). Acupuncture for the Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM, 2020, 7509481. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/7509481
Yin Z, et al. Acupuncture for the Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM. 2020;2020:7509481. PubMed PMID: 32802133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acupuncture for the Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. AU - Yin,Zihan, AU - Xiao,Qiwei, AU - Xu,Guixing, AU - Cheng,Ying, AU - Yang,Han, AU - Zhou,Jun, AU - Fu,Yanan, AU - Chen,Jiao, AU - Zhao,Ling, AU - Liang,Fanrong, Y1 - 2020/07/30/ PY - 2020/03/13/received PY - 2020/05/14/revised PY - 2020/05/21/accepted PY - 2020/8/18/entrez PY - 2020/8/18/pubmed PY - 2020/8/18/medline SP - 7509481 EP - 7509481 JF - Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM VL - 2020 N2 - Background: Postcholecystectomy syndrome (PCS) has become a common postoperative syndrome that requires systematic and comprehensive therapy to achieve adequate clinical control. Acupuncture and related therapies have shown clinical effects for PCS in many studies. However, systematic reviews/meta-analyses (SRs/MAs) for them are lacking. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of PCS using randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Potentially eligible studies were searched in the following electronic databases up to 1 February 2020: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science (WoS), Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), WanFang Database (WF), and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP)), and other sources (WHO ICTRP, ChiCTR, Clinical Trials, and Grey Literature Database). The RevMan 5.3 was employed for analyses. The Cochrane Collaboration' risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias (ROB). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the quality of the evidence. Results: A total of 14 RCTs with 1593 participants were included in this SR. MA showed that acupuncture in combination with conventional medicine (CM) did not show statistical differences in reduction in pain. However, acupuncture in combination with CM significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and improved gastrointestinal function recovery compared to the CM group. Acupuncture combined with traditional Chinese medicine and CM, and acupuncture as monotherapy may improve gastrointestinal function recovery with acceptable adverse events. Conclusion: Acupuncture may be an effective and safe treatment for PCS. However, this study lacks conclusive evidence due to poor quality evidence, limited data, and clinical heterogeneity of acupuncture methods in the included studies. SN - 1741-427X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32802133/Acupuncture_for_the_Postcholecystectomy_Syndrome:_A_Systematic_Review_and_Meta_Analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/7509481 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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