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Risk assessment of iodine intake from the consumption of red seaweeds (Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus).
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020 Dec; 27(36):45737-45741.ES

Abstract

Seaweeds are a basic food in the Asian diet. The search for functional and healthy foods has increased the seaweed consumption in Europe and the USA. Seaweeds are a source of essential elements such as iodine. However, high intake levels of iodine can cause damages to human health. Red seaweeds like dulse (Palmaria palmata) and Irish moss (Chondrus crispus) are common in shops and large stores. The iodine level in 30 samples of red seaweeds (dulse and Irish moss) has been determined by redox volumetry with sodium thiosulfate to determine the iodine content of both species and to assess the iodine dietary exposure from dulse and Irish moss consumption. Irish moss (3.86 ± 1.49 mg/kg dry weight) has the highest average iodine content. Four grams per day of dehydrated Irish moss seaweeds contributes greatly to the iodine recommended daily intake (DRI) for children (25.7%). The consumption of analyzed seaweeds (4 g/day) does not pose a health risk. However, the consumption of 286 g/day of Irish moss would lead to exceeding the UL for the adult population set at 1100 μg/day. It is necessary that the consumer respects the consumption guidelines of the seaweed packers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Toxicology, University of La Laguna, La Laguna, 38071, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.Department of Toxicology, University of La Laguna, La Laguna, 38071, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.Department of Toxicology, University of La Laguna, La Laguna, 38071, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.Department of Toxicology, University of La Laguna, La Laguna, 38071, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. spazmont@ull.edu.es.Department of Toxicology, University of La Laguna, La Laguna, 38071, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32803579

Citation

Darias-Rosales, Javier, et al. "Risk Assessment of Iodine Intake From the Consumption of Red Seaweeds (Palmaria Palmata and Chondrus Crispus)." Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 27, no. 36, 2020, pp. 45737-45741.
Darias-Rosales J, Rubio C, Gutiérrez ÁJ, et al. Risk assessment of iodine intake from the consumption of red seaweeds (Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus). Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020;27(36):45737-45741.
Darias-Rosales, J., Rubio, C., Gutiérrez, Á. J., Paz, S., & Hardisson, A. (2020). Risk assessment of iodine intake from the consumption of red seaweeds (Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus). Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 27(36), 45737-45741. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-10478-9
Darias-Rosales J, et al. Risk Assessment of Iodine Intake From the Consumption of Red Seaweeds (Palmaria Palmata and Chondrus Crispus). Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020;27(36):45737-45741. PubMed PMID: 32803579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk assessment of iodine intake from the consumption of red seaweeds (Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus). AU - Darias-Rosales,Javier, AU - Rubio,Carmen, AU - Gutiérrez,Ángel J, AU - Paz,Soraya, AU - Hardisson,Arturo, Y1 - 2020/08/15/ PY - 2020/03/20/received PY - 2020/08/10/accepted PY - 2020/8/18/pubmed PY - 2020/11/27/medline PY - 2020/8/18/entrez KW - Chondrus crispus KW - Dietary intake KW - Iodine KW - Palmaria palmata KW - Red seaweeds KW - Risk assessment SP - 45737 EP - 45741 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 27 IS - 36 N2 - Seaweeds are a basic food in the Asian diet. The search for functional and healthy foods has increased the seaweed consumption in Europe and the USA. Seaweeds are a source of essential elements such as iodine. However, high intake levels of iodine can cause damages to human health. Red seaweeds like dulse (Palmaria palmata) and Irish moss (Chondrus crispus) are common in shops and large stores. The iodine level in 30 samples of red seaweeds (dulse and Irish moss) has been determined by redox volumetry with sodium thiosulfate to determine the iodine content of both species and to assess the iodine dietary exposure from dulse and Irish moss consumption. Irish moss (3.86 ± 1.49 mg/kg dry weight) has the highest average iodine content. Four grams per day of dehydrated Irish moss seaweeds contributes greatly to the iodine recommended daily intake (DRI) for children (25.7%). The consumption of analyzed seaweeds (4 g/day) does not pose a health risk. However, the consumption of 286 g/day of Irish moss would lead to exceeding the UL for the adult population set at 1100 μg/day. It is necessary that the consumer respects the consumption guidelines of the seaweed packers. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32803579/Risk_assessment_of_iodine_intake_from_the_consumption_of_red_seaweeds__Palmaria_palmata_and_Chondrus_crispus__ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-10478-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -