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Timing the Implementation of Cultural Practices for Spissistilus festinus (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in California Vineyards Using a Stage-Structured Degree-Day Model.
J Econ Entomol. 2020 10 16; 113(5):2558-2562.JE

Abstract

The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus (Say), was shown to transmit Grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV), the causative agent for Grapevine red blotch disease, in a greenhouse study on grapes. GRBV is a major concern of wine grape growers due to its economic impact on wine quality. Plants in the family Fabaceae are preferred hosts of S. festinus and are commonly planted as cover crops or present in a vineyard's native vegetation. In late winter, during grapevine dormancy, S. festinus migrate into vineyards to feed and reproduce on these cover crop and weed hosts. Tilling vineyard floor vegetation provides growers an opportunity to disrupt the life cycle of early instars that are relatively immobile, reducing the S. festinus first-generation population. Nymphal presence is difficult to detect. First through third instars were not detected in sweep net samples in a 2-yr weekly sampling study, whereas fourth and fifth instars were first found on the same sample date as emerging adults. A degree-day model was developed and successfully predicted when early S. festinus instars are present in the vineyard to aid in exploiting the time period when S. festinus is most susceptible to cultural control measures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA. Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.USDA-ARS, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, Parlier. Cooperative Extension, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, Santa Rosa, CA.Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32804241

Citation

Bick, Emily N., et al. "Timing the Implementation of Cultural Practices for Spissistilus Festinus (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in California Vineyards Using a Stage-Structured Degree-Day Model." Journal of Economic Entomology, vol. 113, no. 5, 2020, pp. 2558-2562.
Bick EN, Kron CR, Zalom FG. Timing the Implementation of Cultural Practices for Spissistilus festinus (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in California Vineyards Using a Stage-Structured Degree-Day Model. J Econ Entomol. 2020;113(5):2558-2562.
Bick, E. N., Kron, C. R., & Zalom, F. G. (2020). Timing the Implementation of Cultural Practices for Spissistilus festinus (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in California Vineyards Using a Stage-Structured Degree-Day Model. Journal of Economic Entomology, 113(5), 2558-2562. https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa165
Bick EN, Kron CR, Zalom FG. Timing the Implementation of Cultural Practices for Spissistilus Festinus (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in California Vineyards Using a Stage-Structured Degree-Day Model. J Econ Entomol. 2020 10 16;113(5):2558-2562. PubMed PMID: 32804241.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Timing the Implementation of Cultural Practices for Spissistilus festinus (Hemiptera: Membracidae) in California Vineyards Using a Stage-Structured Degree-Day Model. AU - Bick,Emily N, AU - Kron,Cindy R, AU - Zalom,Frank G, PY - 2020/01/29/received PY - 2020/8/18/pubmed PY - 2021/2/11/medline PY - 2020/8/18/entrez KW - Grapevine red blotch virus KW - Spissistilus festinus KW - GRBV KW - degree-day model KW - three-cornered alfalfa hopper SP - 2558 EP - 2562 JF - Journal of economic entomology JO - J Econ Entomol VL - 113 IS - 5 N2 - The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus (Say), was shown to transmit Grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV), the causative agent for Grapevine red blotch disease, in a greenhouse study on grapes. GRBV is a major concern of wine grape growers due to its economic impact on wine quality. Plants in the family Fabaceae are preferred hosts of S. festinus and are commonly planted as cover crops or present in a vineyard's native vegetation. In late winter, during grapevine dormancy, S. festinus migrate into vineyards to feed and reproduce on these cover crop and weed hosts. Tilling vineyard floor vegetation provides growers an opportunity to disrupt the life cycle of early instars that are relatively immobile, reducing the S. festinus first-generation population. Nymphal presence is difficult to detect. First through third instars were not detected in sweep net samples in a 2-yr weekly sampling study, whereas fourth and fifth instars were first found on the same sample date as emerging adults. A degree-day model was developed and successfully predicted when early S. festinus instars are present in the vineyard to aid in exploiting the time period when S. festinus is most susceptible to cultural control measures. SN - 1938-291X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32804241/Timing_the_Implementation_of_Cultural_Practices_for_Spissistilus_festinus__Hemiptera:_Membracidae__in_California_Vineyards_Using_a_Stage_Structured_Degree_Day_Model_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -