Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Severe Intimate Partner Violence, Sources of Stress and the Mental Health of U.S. Black Women.
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2021 01; 30(1):17-28.JW

Abstract

Background:

We investigate the mental health risk of U.S. Black women by examining the roles of intimate partner violence (IPV), major discrimination, neighborhood characteristics, and sociodemographic factors using one of the largest and most complete datasets on U.S. Blacks. Materials and

Methods:

The National Survey of American Life (NSAL) used a slightly modified version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) with a sample of 6082 participants. We also assess intraracial group differences based on ethnicity and nativity status (U.S.-born African American, U.S.-born Caribbean Black, and foreign-born Caribbean Black).

Results:

The study provides evidence that severe physical intimate partner violence (SPIPV) is a significant threat to the mental health of U.S. Black women. Bivariate and multivariate analyses indicate that those with a history of SPIPV were at greater risk for mental disorders than women who did not experience violence by a spouse or partner. Racial discrimination was associated with higher odds of anxiety and substance disorders, whereas gender discrimination was associated with higher odds of mood disorders. Neighborhood drug problems also increased the odds of mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Older age and being an Afro-Caribbean immigrant were associated with lower odds of three of four mental disorders.

Conclusions:

Findings from the study indicate the need for community and clinical interventions aimed at addressing IPV and other community factors that influence Black women's mental health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan, USA.Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.College of Arts, Sciences and Letters, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32813617

Citation

Lacey, Krim K., et al. "Severe Intimate Partner Violence, Sources of Stress and the Mental Health of U.S. Black Women." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 30, no. 1, 2021, pp. 17-28.
Lacey KK, Mouzon DM, Parnell RN, et al. Severe Intimate Partner Violence, Sources of Stress and the Mental Health of U.S. Black Women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2021;30(1):17-28.
Lacey, K. K., Mouzon, D. M., Parnell, R. N., & Laws, T. (2021). Severe Intimate Partner Violence, Sources of Stress and the Mental Health of U.S. Black Women. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 30(1), 17-28. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2019.8215
Lacey KK, et al. Severe Intimate Partner Violence, Sources of Stress and the Mental Health of U.S. Black Women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2021;30(1):17-28. PubMed PMID: 32813617.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe Intimate Partner Violence, Sources of Stress and the Mental Health of U.S. Black Women. AU - Lacey,Krim K, AU - Mouzon,Dawne M, AU - Parnell,Regina N, AU - Laws,Terri, Y1 - 2020/08/18/ PY - 2020/8/20/pubmed PY - 2021/5/21/medline PY - 2020/8/20/entrez KW - U.S. Black women KW - intimate partner violence KW - mental health KW - stress SP - 17 EP - 28 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - Background: We investigate the mental health risk of U.S. Black women by examining the roles of intimate partner violence (IPV), major discrimination, neighborhood characteristics, and sociodemographic factors using one of the largest and most complete datasets on U.S. Blacks. Materials and Methods: The National Survey of American Life (NSAL) used a slightly modified version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) with a sample of 6082 participants. We also assess intraracial group differences based on ethnicity and nativity status (U.S.-born African American, U.S.-born Caribbean Black, and foreign-born Caribbean Black). Results: The study provides evidence that severe physical intimate partner violence (SPIPV) is a significant threat to the mental health of U.S. Black women. Bivariate and multivariate analyses indicate that those with a history of SPIPV were at greater risk for mental disorders than women who did not experience violence by a spouse or partner. Racial discrimination was associated with higher odds of anxiety and substance disorders, whereas gender discrimination was associated with higher odds of mood disorders. Neighborhood drug problems also increased the odds of mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Older age and being an Afro-Caribbean immigrant were associated with lower odds of three of four mental disorders. Conclusions: Findings from the study indicate the need for community and clinical interventions aimed at addressing IPV and other community factors that influence Black women's mental health. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32813617/Severe_Intimate_Partner_Violence_Sources_of_Stress_and_the_Mental_Health_of_U_S__Black_Women_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jwh.2019.8215?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -