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Consumer acceptability and chemical composition of whole-wheat breads incorporated with brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) or red seaweed (Chondrus crispus).
J Sci Food Agric. 2021 Mar 15; 101(4):1507-1514.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Seaweeds have been eaten in the diets of coastal cultures for centuries; however, consumption of seaweeds has been limited in Western diets owing to undesirable sensory characteristics and lack of familiarity. Apart from healthful bioactive metabolites, seaweeds are good sources of fibre and minerals. They are nearly a complete protein and have a low fat content (mainly mono- or polyunsaturated). The objectives were (i) to investigate if the addition of brown seaweed, Ascophyllum nodosum, or red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, altered the chemical composition and sensory properties of whole-wheat bread; and (ii) to determine what percentage the addition of brown or red seaweed to whole-wheat bread is acceptable to consumers. The two seaweeds were incorporated into separate batches of whole-wheat bread by percentage weight flour at 0% (control), 2%, 4%, 6%, and 8%.

RESULTS

The products containing the highest amounts of A. nodosum and C. crispus had the highest ash and total dietary fibre. A. nodosum and C. crispus breads were acceptable at 4% and 2% levels respectively. The attributes of no aftertaste, soft, and chewy drove consumer liking of the whole-wheat bread, whereas attributes dry, dense, strong aftertaste, and saltiness detracted from liking.

CONCLUSION

This project's significance is to demonstrate the acceptability of seaweed in a Western population, which may lay the groundwork to encourage and promote the consumption of seaweed or to exemplify seaweed incorporation into foodstuffs. © 2020 Society of Chemical Industry.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada.School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32851673

Citation

Lamont, Timothy, and Matthew McSweeney. "Consumer Acceptability and Chemical Composition of Whole-wheat Breads Incorporated With Brown Seaweed (Ascophyllum Nodosum) or Red Seaweed (Chondrus Crispus)." Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol. 101, no. 4, 2021, pp. 1507-1514.
Lamont T, McSweeney M. Consumer acceptability and chemical composition of whole-wheat breads incorporated with brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) or red seaweed (Chondrus crispus). J Sci Food Agric. 2021;101(4):1507-1514.
Lamont, T., & McSweeney, M. (2021). Consumer acceptability and chemical composition of whole-wheat breads incorporated with brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) or red seaweed (Chondrus crispus). Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 101(4), 1507-1514. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10765
Lamont T, McSweeney M. Consumer Acceptability and Chemical Composition of Whole-wheat Breads Incorporated With Brown Seaweed (Ascophyllum Nodosum) or Red Seaweed (Chondrus Crispus). J Sci Food Agric. 2021 Mar 15;101(4):1507-1514. PubMed PMID: 32851673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumer acceptability and chemical composition of whole-wheat breads incorporated with brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) or red seaweed (Chondrus crispus). AU - Lamont,Timothy, AU - McSweeney,Matthew, Y1 - 2020/09/11/ PY - 2020/06/02/received PY - 2020/08/20/revised PY - 2020/08/26/accepted PY - 2020/8/28/pubmed PY - 2020/8/28/medline PY - 2020/8/28/entrez KW - check-all-that-apply KW - consumer perception KW - functional foods KW - hedonic scales KW - macroalgae SP - 1507 EP - 1514 JF - Journal of the science of food and agriculture JO - J Sci Food Agric VL - 101 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Seaweeds have been eaten in the diets of coastal cultures for centuries; however, consumption of seaweeds has been limited in Western diets owing to undesirable sensory characteristics and lack of familiarity. Apart from healthful bioactive metabolites, seaweeds are good sources of fibre and minerals. They are nearly a complete protein and have a low fat content (mainly mono- or polyunsaturated). The objectives were (i) to investigate if the addition of brown seaweed, Ascophyllum nodosum, or red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, altered the chemical composition and sensory properties of whole-wheat bread; and (ii) to determine what percentage the addition of brown or red seaweed to whole-wheat bread is acceptable to consumers. The two seaweeds were incorporated into separate batches of whole-wheat bread by percentage weight flour at 0% (control), 2%, 4%, 6%, and 8%. RESULTS: The products containing the highest amounts of A. nodosum and C. crispus had the highest ash and total dietary fibre. A. nodosum and C. crispus breads were acceptable at 4% and 2% levels respectively. The attributes of no aftertaste, soft, and chewy drove consumer liking of the whole-wheat bread, whereas attributes dry, dense, strong aftertaste, and saltiness detracted from liking. CONCLUSION: This project's significance is to demonstrate the acceptability of seaweed in a Western population, which may lay the groundwork to encourage and promote the consumption of seaweed or to exemplify seaweed incorporation into foodstuffs. © 2020 Society of Chemical Industry. SN - 1097-0010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32851673/Consumer_acceptability_and_chemical_composition_of_whole_wheat_breads_incorporated_with_brown_seaweed__Ascophyllum_nodosum__or_red_seaweed__Chondrus_crispus__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10765 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -