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Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Viral Infections: Implications for COVID-19.
Stem Cell Rev Rep. 2021 02; 17(1):71-93.SC

Abstract

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) constitute a heterogeneous population of stromal cells with immunomodulatory and regenerative properties that support their therapeutic use. MSCs isolated from many tissue sources replicate vigorously in vitro and maintain their main biological properties allowing their widespread clinical application. To date, most MSC-based preclinical and clinical trials targeted immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. Nevertheless, MSCs have antiviral properties and have been used in the treatment of various viral infections in the last years. Here, we revised in detail the biological properties of MSCs and their preclinical and clinical applications in viral diseases, including the disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (COVID-19). Notably, rapidly increasing numbers of MSC-based therapies for COVID-19 have recently been reported. MSCs are theoretically capable of reducing inflammation and promote lung regeneration in severe COVID-19 patients. We critically discuss the rationale, advantages and disadvantages of MSC-based therapies for viral infections and also specifically for COVID-19 and point out some directions in this field. Finally, we argue that MSC-based therapy may be a promising therapeutic strategy for severe COVID-19 and other emergent respiratory tract viral infections, beyond the viral infection diseases in which MSCs have already been clinically applied. Graphical Abstract.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Basic and Applied Immunology Program, Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Bioscience and Biotecnology Program, Department of Clinical Analysis, Toxicology and Food Science, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Bioscience and Biotecnology Program, Department of Clinical Analysis, Toxicology and Food Science, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Bioscience and Biotecnology Program, Department of Clinical Analysis, Toxicology and Food Science, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Av. do Café s/n, Ribeirão Preto, 14040-903, São Paulo, Brazil.Center for Cell-based Therapy, Regional Blood Center of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. kelenfarias@fcfrp.usp.br. School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Av. do Café s/n, Ribeirão Preto, 14040-903, São Paulo, Brazil. kelenfarias@fcfrp.usp.br.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32895900

Citation

Rocha, José Lucas Martins, et al. "Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Viral Infections: Implications for COVID-19." Stem Cell Reviews and Reports, vol. 17, no. 1, 2021, pp. 71-93.
Rocha JLM, de Oliveira WCF, Noronha NC, et al. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Viral Infections: Implications for COVID-19. Stem Cell Rev Rep. 2021;17(1):71-93.
Rocha, J. L. M., de Oliveira, W. C. F., Noronha, N. C., Dos Santos, N. C. D., Covas, D. T., Picanço-Castro, V., Swiech, K., & Malmegrim, K. C. R. (2021). Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Viral Infections: Implications for COVID-19. Stem Cell Reviews and Reports, 17(1), 71-93. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12015-020-10032-7
Rocha JLM, et al. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Viral Infections: Implications for COVID-19. Stem Cell Rev Rep. 2021;17(1):71-93. PubMed PMID: 32895900.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Viral Infections: Implications for COVID-19. AU - Rocha,José Lucas Martins, AU - de Oliveira,Waldir César Ferreira, AU - Noronha,Nádia Cássia, AU - Dos Santos,Natalia Cristine Dias, AU - Covas,Dimas Tadeu, AU - Picanço-Castro,Virgínia, AU - Swiech,Kamilla, AU - Malmegrim,Kelen Cristina Ribeiro, PY - 2020/9/9/pubmed PY - 2021/3/3/medline PY - 2020/9/8/entrez KW - Acute respiratory distress syndrome KW - COVID-19 KW - Cell therapy KW - Immunomodulation KW - Mesenchymal stromal cells KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - Viral diseases KW - Viral infections SP - 71 EP - 93 JF - Stem cell reviews and reports JO - Stem Cell Rev Rep VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) constitute a heterogeneous population of stromal cells with immunomodulatory and regenerative properties that support their therapeutic use. MSCs isolated from many tissue sources replicate vigorously in vitro and maintain their main biological properties allowing their widespread clinical application. To date, most MSC-based preclinical and clinical trials targeted immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. Nevertheless, MSCs have antiviral properties and have been used in the treatment of various viral infections in the last years. Here, we revised in detail the biological properties of MSCs and their preclinical and clinical applications in viral diseases, including the disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (COVID-19). Notably, rapidly increasing numbers of MSC-based therapies for COVID-19 have recently been reported. MSCs are theoretically capable of reducing inflammation and promote lung regeneration in severe COVID-19 patients. We critically discuss the rationale, advantages and disadvantages of MSC-based therapies for viral infections and also specifically for COVID-19 and point out some directions in this field. Finally, we argue that MSC-based therapy may be a promising therapeutic strategy for severe COVID-19 and other emergent respiratory tract viral infections, beyond the viral infection diseases in which MSCs have already been clinically applied. Graphical Abstract. SN - 2629-3277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32895900/Mesenchymal_Stromal_Cells_in_Viral_Infections:_Implications_for_COVID_19_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s12015-020-10032-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -