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Environmental and Aerosolized Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Among Hospitalized Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients.
J Infect Dis. 2020 11 09; 222(11):1798-1806.JI

Abstract

During April and May 2020, we studied 20 patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), their hospital rooms (fomites and aerosols), and their close contacts for molecular and culture evidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Among >400 samples, we found molecular evidence of virus in most sample types, especially the nasopharyngeal (NP), saliva, and fecal samples, but the prevalence of molecular positivity among fomites and aerosols was low. The agreement between NP swab and saliva positivity was high (89.5%; κ = 0.79). Two NP swabs collected from patients on days 1 and 7 post-symptom onset had evidence of infectious virus (2 passages over 14 days in Vero E6 cells). In summary, the low molecular prevalence and lack of viable SARS-CoV-2 virus in fomites and air samples implied low nosocomial risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission through inanimate objects or aerosols.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. National Health Commission Key Laboratory of Systems Biology of Pathogens, Institute of Pathogen Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, Singapore.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Environmental and Global Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.Department of Pathology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Department of Pathology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, Singapore. Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32905595

Citation

Binder, Raquel A., et al. "Environmental and Aerosolized Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Among Hospitalized Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 222, no. 11, 2020, pp. 1798-1806.
Binder RA, Alarja NA, Robie ER, et al. Environmental and Aerosolized Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Among Hospitalized Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients. J Infect Dis. 2020;222(11):1798-1806.
Binder, R. A., Alarja, N. A., Robie, E. R., Kochek, K. E., Xiu, L., Rocha-Melogno, L., Abdelgadir, A., Goli, S. V., Farrell, A. S., Coleman, K. K., Turner, A. L., Lautredou, C. C., Lednicky, J. A., Lee, M. J., Polage, C. R., Simmons, R. A., Deshusses, M. A., Anderson, B. D., & Gray, G. C. (2020). Environmental and Aerosolized Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Among Hospitalized Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 222(11), 1798-1806. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiaa575
Binder RA, et al. Environmental and Aerosolized Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Among Hospitalized Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients. J Infect Dis. 2020 11 9;222(11):1798-1806. PubMed PMID: 32905595.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Environmental and Aerosolized Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Among Hospitalized Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients. AU - Binder,Raquel A, AU - Alarja,Natalie A, AU - Robie,Emily R, AU - Kochek,Kara E, AU - Xiu,Leshan, AU - Rocha-Melogno,Lucas, AU - Abdelgadir,Anfal, AU - Goli,Sumana V, AU - Farrell,Amanda S, AU - Coleman,Kristen K, AU - Turner,Abigail L, AU - Lautredou,Cassandra C, AU - Lednicky,John A, AU - Lee,Mark J, AU - Polage,Christopher R, AU - Simmons,Ryan A, AU - Deshusses,Marc A, AU - Anderson,Benjamin D, AU - Gray,Gregory C, PY - 2020/08/18/received PY - 2020/09/04/accepted PY - 2020/9/10/pubmed PY - 2020/12/18/medline PY - 2020/9/9/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - aerosol KW - epidemiology KW - transmission SP - 1798 EP - 1806 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 222 IS - 11 N2 - During April and May 2020, we studied 20 patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), their hospital rooms (fomites and aerosols), and their close contacts for molecular and culture evidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Among >400 samples, we found molecular evidence of virus in most sample types, especially the nasopharyngeal (NP), saliva, and fecal samples, but the prevalence of molecular positivity among fomites and aerosols was low. The agreement between NP swab and saliva positivity was high (89.5%; κ = 0.79). Two NP swabs collected from patients on days 1 and 7 post-symptom onset had evidence of infectious virus (2 passages over 14 days in Vero E6 cells). In summary, the low molecular prevalence and lack of viable SARS-CoV-2 virus in fomites and air samples implied low nosocomial risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission through inanimate objects or aerosols. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32905595/Environmental_and_Aerosolized_Severe_Acute_Respiratory_Syndrome_Coronavirus_2_Among_Hospitalized_Coronavirus_Disease_2019_Patients_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/infdis/jiaa575 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -