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The Risks of Being Otologist, an Ergonomic and Occupational Hazard Review.
Otol Neurotol. 2020 10; 41(9):1182-1189.ON

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To review occupational ergonomic risks for the Otologist and Neurotologist.

DATA SOURCES

MEDLINE, OVID, PubMed, and Google Scholar.

STUDY SELECTION

A search was conducted to identify all studies in the English language that involve ergonomic-related risks for surgeons.

RESULTS

Occupational hazards, particularly musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), are common in the surgical community in general and among Otolaryngologists in particular. Very few studies have been conducted assessing MSDs specific to Otologists and Neurotologists. However, extrapolating from other surgical professions with similar ergonomic postures in the operation room and office, one can infer that cervical and lumbar pain are related to prolonged static sitting and neck flexion when working with a microscope and begins early in training. Early institution of correct ergonomic training is feasible and may be effective. Improved ergonomic habits include upright sitting, avoidance of neck flexion, initiating short breaks, and the use of chairs with arm and back support. Future technologies incorporated into otologic surgery should have improved ergonomic design.

CONCLUSIONS

Otologists and Neurotologists are exposed to MSDs directly related to their work demands. Incorporating healthy ergonomics into surgical training as well adopting correct posture and the use equipment designed for back support may help mitigate the long-terms risks of MSD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32925834

Citation

Stern Shavit, Sagit, et al. "The Risks of Being Otologist, an Ergonomic and Occupational Hazard Review." Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, vol. 41, no. 9, 2020, pp. 1182-1189.
Stern Shavit S, Golub JS, Lustig LR. The Risks of Being Otologist, an Ergonomic and Occupational Hazard Review. Otol Neurotol. 2020;41(9):1182-1189.
Stern Shavit, S., Golub, J. S., & Lustig, L. R. (2020). The Risks of Being Otologist, an Ergonomic and Occupational Hazard Review. Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, 41(9), 1182-1189. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000002769
Stern Shavit S, Golub JS, Lustig LR. The Risks of Being Otologist, an Ergonomic and Occupational Hazard Review. Otol Neurotol. 2020;41(9):1182-1189. PubMed PMID: 32925834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Risks of Being Otologist, an Ergonomic and Occupational Hazard Review. AU - Stern Shavit,Sagit, AU - Golub,Justin S, AU - Lustig,Lawrence R, PY - 2020/9/14/entrez PY - 2020/9/15/pubmed PY - 2021/4/15/medline SP - 1182 EP - 1189 JF - Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology JO - Otol Neurotol VL - 41 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review occupational ergonomic risks for the Otologist and Neurotologist. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, OVID, PubMed, and Google Scholar. STUDY SELECTION: A search was conducted to identify all studies in the English language that involve ergonomic-related risks for surgeons. RESULTS: Occupational hazards, particularly musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), are common in the surgical community in general and among Otolaryngologists in particular. Very few studies have been conducted assessing MSDs specific to Otologists and Neurotologists. However, extrapolating from other surgical professions with similar ergonomic postures in the operation room and office, one can infer that cervical and lumbar pain are related to prolonged static sitting and neck flexion when working with a microscope and begins early in training. Early institution of correct ergonomic training is feasible and may be effective. Improved ergonomic habits include upright sitting, avoidance of neck flexion, initiating short breaks, and the use of chairs with arm and back support. Future technologies incorporated into otologic surgery should have improved ergonomic design. CONCLUSIONS: Otologists and Neurotologists are exposed to MSDs directly related to their work demands. Incorporating healthy ergonomics into surgical training as well adopting correct posture and the use equipment designed for back support may help mitigate the long-terms risks of MSD. SN - 1537-4505 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32925834/The_Risks_of_Being_Otologist_an_Ergonomic_and_Occupational_Hazard_Review_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -