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Association of Dance-Based Mind-Motor Activities With Falls and Physical Function Among Healthy Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 09 01; 3(9):e2017688.JN

Abstract

Importance

Falls increase morbidity and mortality in adults 65 years and older. The role of dance-based mind-motor activities in preventing falls among healthy older adults is not well established.

Objective

To assess the effectiveness of dance-based mind-motor activities in preventing falls.

Data Sources

Systematic search included the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Abstracts in Social Gerontology, AgeLine, AMED, and Scopus databases from database inception to February 18, 2018, using the Medical Subject Headings aged 65 and older, accidental falls, and dancing.

Study Selection

This systematic review and meta-analysis included 29 randomized clinical trials that evaluated a dance-based mind-motor activity in healthy older adults with regard to fall risk, fall rate, or well-established measures of physical function in the domains of balance, mobility, and strength. The included studies targeted participants without comorbidities associated with higher fall risk. Dance-based mind-motor activities were defined as coordinated upright mind-motor movements that emphasize dynamic balance, structured through music or an inner rhythm (eg, breathing) and distinctive instructions or choreography, and that involve social interaction.

Data Extraction and Synthesis

Standardized independent screening, data extraction, and bias assessment were performed. Data were pooled using random-effects models. The study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guideline.

Main Outcomes and Measures

Primary outcomes were risk of falling and rate of falls. For the secondary end points of physical function (balance, mobility, and strength), standardized mean differences (SMDs) were estimated and pooled (Hedges g).

Results

In this systematic review and meta-analysis of 29 randomized clinical trials, dance-based mind-motor activities were significantly associated with reduced (37%) risk of falling (risk ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49-0.80; 8 trials, 1579 participants) and a significantly reduced (31%) rate of falls (incidence rate ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89; 7 trials, 2012 participants). In addition, dance-based mind-motor activities were significantly associated with improved physical function in the domains of balance (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.33-0.90; 15 trials, 1476 participants), mobility (SMD, -0.56; 95% CI, -0.81 to -0.31; 13 trials, 1379 participants), and lower body strength (SMD, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.23-0.91; 13 trials, 1613 participants) but not upper body strength (SMD, 0.18; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.38; 4 trials, 414 participants).

Conclusion and Relevance

Among healthy older adults, dance-based mind-motor activities were associated with decreased risk of falling and rate of falls and improved balance, mobility, and lower body strength. This type of activity may be useful in preventing falls in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.University Department of Geriatric Medicine Felix Platter, Basel, Switzerland.Horten Centre, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Center on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32975570

Citation

Mattle, Michèle, et al. "Association of Dance-Based Mind-Motor Activities With Falls and Physical Function Among Healthy Older Adults: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." JAMA Network Open, vol. 3, no. 9, 2020, pp. e2017688.
Mattle M, Chocano-Bedoya PO, Fischbacher M, et al. Association of Dance-Based Mind-Motor Activities With Falls and Physical Function Among Healthy Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Netw Open. 2020;3(9):e2017688.
Mattle, M., Chocano-Bedoya, P. O., Fischbacher, M., Meyer, U., Abderhalden, L. A., Lang, W., Mansky, R., Kressig, R. W., Steurer, J., Orav, E. J., & Bischoff-Ferrari, H. A. (2020). Association of Dance-Based Mind-Motor Activities With Falls and Physical Function Among Healthy Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Network Open, 3(9), e2017688. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.17688
Mattle M, et al. Association of Dance-Based Mind-Motor Activities With Falls and Physical Function Among Healthy Older Adults: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Netw Open. 2020 09 1;3(9):e2017688. PubMed PMID: 32975570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Dance-Based Mind-Motor Activities With Falls and Physical Function Among Healthy Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. AU - Mattle,Michèle, AU - Chocano-Bedoya,Patricia O, AU - Fischbacher,Melanie, AU - Meyer,Ursina, AU - Abderhalden,Lauren A, AU - Lang,Wei, AU - Mansky,Richard, AU - Kressig,Reto W, AU - Steurer,Johann, AU - Orav,E John, AU - Bischoff-Ferrari,Heike A, Y1 - 2020/09/01/ PY - 2020/9/25/entrez PY - 2020/9/26/pubmed PY - 2021/1/14/medline SP - e2017688 EP - e2017688 JF - JAMA network open JO - JAMA Netw Open VL - 3 IS - 9 N2 - Importance: Falls increase morbidity and mortality in adults 65 years and older. The role of dance-based mind-motor activities in preventing falls among healthy older adults is not well established. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of dance-based mind-motor activities in preventing falls. Data Sources: Systematic search included the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Abstracts in Social Gerontology, AgeLine, AMED, and Scopus databases from database inception to February 18, 2018, using the Medical Subject Headings aged 65 and older, accidental falls, and dancing. Study Selection: This systematic review and meta-analysis included 29 randomized clinical trials that evaluated a dance-based mind-motor activity in healthy older adults with regard to fall risk, fall rate, or well-established measures of physical function in the domains of balance, mobility, and strength. The included studies targeted participants without comorbidities associated with higher fall risk. Dance-based mind-motor activities were defined as coordinated upright mind-motor movements that emphasize dynamic balance, structured through music or an inner rhythm (eg, breathing) and distinctive instructions or choreography, and that involve social interaction. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Standardized independent screening, data extraction, and bias assessment were performed. Data were pooled using random-effects models. The study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guideline. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes were risk of falling and rate of falls. For the secondary end points of physical function (balance, mobility, and strength), standardized mean differences (SMDs) were estimated and pooled (Hedges g). Results: In this systematic review and meta-analysis of 29 randomized clinical trials, dance-based mind-motor activities were significantly associated with reduced (37%) risk of falling (risk ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49-0.80; 8 trials, 1579 participants) and a significantly reduced (31%) rate of falls (incidence rate ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89; 7 trials, 2012 participants). In addition, dance-based mind-motor activities were significantly associated with improved physical function in the domains of balance (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.33-0.90; 15 trials, 1476 participants), mobility (SMD, -0.56; 95% CI, -0.81 to -0.31; 13 trials, 1379 participants), and lower body strength (SMD, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.23-0.91; 13 trials, 1613 participants) but not upper body strength (SMD, 0.18; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.38; 4 trials, 414 participants). Conclusion and Relevance: Among healthy older adults, dance-based mind-motor activities were associated with decreased risk of falling and rate of falls and improved balance, mobility, and lower body strength. This type of activity may be useful in preventing falls in this population. SN - 2574-3805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32975570/Association_of_Dance_Based_Mind_Motor_Activities_With_Falls_and_Physical_Function_Among_Healthy_Older_Adults:_A_Systematic_Review_and_Meta_analysis_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.17688 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -