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Identifying the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Environmental Monitoring in Airborne Infectious Isolation Rooms (AIIRs).
Virol Sin. 2020 Dec; 35(6):785-792.VS

Abstract

Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to the new pandemic human coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and are a source of nosocomial transmission in airborne infectious isolation rooms (AIIRs). Here, we performed comprehensive environmental contamination surveillance to evaluate the risk of viral transmission in AIIRs with 115 rooms in three buildings at the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai, during the treatment of 334 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. The results showed that the risk of airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in AIIRs was low (1.62%, 25/1544) due to the directional airflow and strong environmental hygiene procedures. However, we detected viral RNA on the surface of foot-operated openers and bathroom sinks in AIIRs (viral load: 55.00-3154.50 copies/mL). This might be a source of contamination to connecting corridors and object surfaces through the footwear and gloves used by HCWs. The risk of infection was eliminated by the use of disposable footwear covers and the application of more effective environmental and personal hygiene measures. With the help of effective infection control procedures, none of 290 HCWs was infected when working in the AIIRs at this hospital. This study has provided information pertinent for infection control in AIIRs during the treatment of COVID-19 patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.College of Marine Sciences, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China.Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200438, China.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China. Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, School of Life and Environmental Sciences and School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China. zhutongyu@shphc.org.cn.Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China. zhangyongzhen@shphc.org.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32986229

Citation

Song, Zhi-Gang, et al. "Identifying the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Environmental Monitoring in Airborne Infectious Isolation Rooms (AIIRs)." Virologica Sinica, vol. 35, no. 6, 2020, pp. 785-792.
Song ZG, Chen YM, Wu F, et al. Identifying the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Environmental Monitoring in Airborne Infectious Isolation Rooms (AIIRs). Virol Sin. 2020;35(6):785-792.
Song, Z. G., Chen, Y. M., Wu, F., Xu, L., Wang, B. F., Shi, L., Chen, X., Dai, F. H., She, J. L., Chen, J. M., Holmes, E. C., Zhu, T. Y., & Zhang, Y. Z. (2020). Identifying the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Environmental Monitoring in Airborne Infectious Isolation Rooms (AIIRs). Virologica Sinica, 35(6), 785-792. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12250-020-00301-7
Song ZG, et al. Identifying the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Environmental Monitoring in Airborne Infectious Isolation Rooms (AIIRs). Virol Sin. 2020;35(6):785-792. PubMed PMID: 32986229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identifying the Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Environmental Monitoring in Airborne Infectious Isolation Rooms (AIIRs). AU - Song,Zhi-Gang, AU - Chen,Yan-Mei, AU - Wu,Fan, AU - Xu,Lin, AU - Wang,Bang-Fang, AU - Shi,Lei, AU - Chen,Xiao, AU - Dai,Fa-Hui, AU - She,Jia-Lei, AU - Chen,Jian-Min, AU - Holmes,Edward C, AU - Zhu,Tong-Yu, AU - Zhang,Yong-Zhen, Y1 - 2020/09/28/ PY - 2020/05/28/received PY - 2020/08/31/accepted PY - 2020/9/29/pubmed PY - 2021/2/16/medline PY - 2020/9/28/entrez KW - AIIRs KW - COVID-19 KW - Environmental sampling KW - Nosocomial transmission KW - SARS-CoV-2 SP - 785 EP - 792 JF - Virologica Sinica JO - Virol Sin VL - 35 IS - 6 N2 - Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to the new pandemic human coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and are a source of nosocomial transmission in airborne infectious isolation rooms (AIIRs). Here, we performed comprehensive environmental contamination surveillance to evaluate the risk of viral transmission in AIIRs with 115 rooms in three buildings at the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai, during the treatment of 334 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. The results showed that the risk of airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in AIIRs was low (1.62%, 25/1544) due to the directional airflow and strong environmental hygiene procedures. However, we detected viral RNA on the surface of foot-operated openers and bathroom sinks in AIIRs (viral load: 55.00-3154.50 copies/mL). This might be a source of contamination to connecting corridors and object surfaces through the footwear and gloves used by HCWs. The risk of infection was eliminated by the use of disposable footwear covers and the application of more effective environmental and personal hygiene measures. With the help of effective infection control procedures, none of 290 HCWs was infected when working in the AIIRs at this hospital. This study has provided information pertinent for infection control in AIIRs during the treatment of COVID-19 patients. SN - 1995-820X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32986229/Identifying_the_Risk_of_SARS_CoV_2_Infection_and_Environmental_Monitoring_in_Airborne_Infectious_Isolation_Rooms__AIIRs__ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12250-020-00301-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -