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Dairy products, surrogate markers, and cardiovascular disease; a sex-specific analysis from the ATTICA prospective study.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2020 11 27; 30(12):2194-2206.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Dairy products are a very diverse food group with multiple effects on the cardiac health of men and women. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sex-specific association between dairy products (total and subtypes) and 10-year first fatal/nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence.

METHODS AND RESULTS

In 2001-2002, n = 1514 men and n = 1528 women (>18 years old) from greater Athens area, Greece, were enrolled. Dietary assessment was based on a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Dairy product consumption was examined in relation to 10-year CVD incidence. Follow-up (2011-2012) was achieved in n = 2020 participants (n = 317 CVD cases). Ranking from lowest (<1 serving/day) to highest (>2 servings/day) total dairy intake, CVD incidence in men was 17.8%, 15.0%, and 10.9% (p = 0.41), while in women it was 14%, 6.0%, and 5.7% (p = 0.02). Multiadjusted analysis revealed that total dairy intake protected against CVD only in women [Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.48 and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) (0.23, 0.90)], irrespective of the fat content. Further analysis revealed that only fermented products (yogurt and cheese), protected against CVD. For per 200 g/day yogurt consumption, CVD risk was 20%-30% lower with this claim being more evident in women, while for per 30 g/day cheese intake, about 5% lower risk was observed particularly in men. As for butter, nonsignificant associations were highlighted. These associations were mainly retained in the case of hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation.

CONCLUSIONS

This work provides incentives for researchers to elucidate the diversity of ingredients and mechanisms through which dairy products exert their effect on cardiac health separately for men and women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece; Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia. Electronic address: d.b.panagiotakos@usa.net.First Cardiology Clinic, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece; School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Sydney, Australia; Medical School, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.First Cardiology Clinic, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.First Cardiology Clinic, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32988722

Citation

Kouvari, Matina, et al. "Dairy Products, Surrogate Markers, and Cardiovascular Disease; a Sex-specific Analysis From the ATTICA Prospective Study." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 30, no. 12, 2020, pp. 2194-2206.
Kouvari M, Panagiotakos DB, Chrysohoou C, et al. Dairy products, surrogate markers, and cardiovascular disease; a sex-specific analysis from the ATTICA prospective study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2020;30(12):2194-2206.
Kouvari, M., Panagiotakos, D. B., Chrysohoou, C., Georgousopoulou, E. N., Yannakoulia, M., Tousoulis, D., & Pitsavos, C. (2020). Dairy products, surrogate markers, and cardiovascular disease; a sex-specific analysis from the ATTICA prospective study. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 30(12), 2194-2206. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2020.07.037
Kouvari M, et al. Dairy Products, Surrogate Markers, and Cardiovascular Disease; a Sex-specific Analysis From the ATTICA Prospective Study. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2020 11 27;30(12):2194-2206. PubMed PMID: 32988722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy products, surrogate markers, and cardiovascular disease; a sex-specific analysis from the ATTICA prospective study. AU - Kouvari,Matina, AU - Panagiotakos,Demosthenes B, AU - Chrysohoou,Christina, AU - Georgousopoulou,Ekavi N, AU - Yannakoulia,Mary, AU - Tousoulis,Dimitrios, AU - Pitsavos,Christos, AU - ,, Y1 - 2020/07/31/ PY - 2020/05/06/received PY - 2020/07/20/revised PY - 2020/07/20/accepted PY - 2020/9/30/pubmed PY - 2020/12/15/medline PY - 2020/9/29/entrez KW - Fermented dairy products KW - Gender KW - Heart disease KW - Milk KW - Women KW - Yogurt SP - 2194 EP - 2206 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 30 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Dairy products are a very diverse food group with multiple effects on the cardiac health of men and women. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sex-specific association between dairy products (total and subtypes) and 10-year first fatal/nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 2001-2002, n = 1514 men and n = 1528 women (>18 years old) from greater Athens area, Greece, were enrolled. Dietary assessment was based on a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Dairy product consumption was examined in relation to 10-year CVD incidence. Follow-up (2011-2012) was achieved in n = 2020 participants (n = 317 CVD cases). Ranking from lowest (<1 serving/day) to highest (>2 servings/day) total dairy intake, CVD incidence in men was 17.8%, 15.0%, and 10.9% (p = 0.41), while in women it was 14%, 6.0%, and 5.7% (p = 0.02). Multiadjusted analysis revealed that total dairy intake protected against CVD only in women [Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.48 and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) (0.23, 0.90)], irrespective of the fat content. Further analysis revealed that only fermented products (yogurt and cheese), protected against CVD. For per 200 g/day yogurt consumption, CVD risk was 20%-30% lower with this claim being more evident in women, while for per 30 g/day cheese intake, about 5% lower risk was observed particularly in men. As for butter, nonsignificant associations were highlighted. These associations were mainly retained in the case of hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: This work provides incentives for researchers to elucidate the diversity of ingredients and mechanisms through which dairy products exert their effect on cardiac health separately for men and women. SN - 1590-3729 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32988722/Dairy_products_surrogate_markers_and_cardiovascular_disease L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-4753(20)30312-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -