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Effectiveness of personal protective equipment in preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection among healthcare workers.
J Infect Chemother. 2021 Jan; 27(1):120-122.JI

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Information on the effectiveness of personal protective equipment (PPE) for preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among healthcare workers (HCWs), especially among HCWs with frequent contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2, is limited.

METHODS

We conducted a prospective cohort study on 49 HCWs who worked in close contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. HCWs had blood samples taken every 2 weeks to test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using two different types of assay.

RESULTS

Forty-nine participants (31 nurses, 15 doctors, 3 other workers) were enrolled. In total, 112 blood samples are obtained from participants. The median work days in 2 weeks was 9 (interquartile range (IQR): 5-10) days. In a single work day, 30 of the 49 participants (61.5%) had contact with patients with suspected or conformed SARS-CoV-2 at least 8 times, and approximately 60% of participants had more than 10 min of contact with a single patient. The median self-reported compliance to PPE was 90% (IQR: 80-100%). Seven participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); however, none were seropositive for SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody, so the positive ELISA results were assumed to be false-positive.

CONCLUSIONS

The study provides evidence that appropriate PPE is sufficient to prevent infection amongHCWs. It is necessary to establish a system that provides a stable supply of PPE for HCWs to perform their duties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. Electronic address: tesuzuki@hosp.ncgm.go.jp.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.Infection Control Team, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Nursing, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32988731

Citation

Suzuki, Tetsuya, et al. "Effectiveness of Personal Protective Equipment in Preventing Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Infection Among Healthcare Workers." Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy : Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy, vol. 27, no. 1, 2021, pp. 120-122.
Suzuki T, Hayakawa K, Ainai A, et al. Effectiveness of personal protective equipment in preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection among healthcare workers. J Infect Chemother. 2021;27(1):120-122.
Suzuki, T., Hayakawa, K., Ainai, A., Iwata-Yoshikawa, N., Sano, K., Nagata, N., Suzuki, T., Wakimoto, Y., Akiyama, Y., Miyazato, Y., Nakamura, K., Ide, S., Nomoto, H., Nakamoto, T., Ota, M., Moriyama, Y., Sugiki, Y., Saito, S., Morioka, S., ... Ohmagari, N. (2021). Effectiveness of personal protective equipment in preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection among healthcare workers. Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy : Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy, 27(1), 120-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2020.09.006
Suzuki T, et al. Effectiveness of Personal Protective Equipment in Preventing Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Infection Among Healthcare Workers. J Infect Chemother. 2021;27(1):120-122. PubMed PMID: 32988731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness of personal protective equipment in preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection among healthcare workers. AU - Suzuki,Tetsuya, AU - Hayakawa,Kayoko, AU - Ainai,Akira, AU - Iwata-Yoshikawa,Naoko, AU - Sano,Kaori, AU - Nagata,Noriyo, AU - Suzuki,Tadaki, AU - Wakimoto,Yuji, AU - Akiyama,Yutaro, AU - Miyazato,Yusuke, AU - Nakamura,Keiji, AU - Ide,Satoshi, AU - Nomoto,Hidetoshi, AU - Nakamoto,Takato, AU - Ota,Masayuki, AU - Moriyama,Yuki, AU - Sugiki,Yuko, AU - Saito,Sho, AU - Morioka,Shinichiro, AU - Ishikane,Masahiro, AU - Kinoshita,Noriko, AU - Kutsuna,Satoshi, AU - Ohmagari,Norio, Y1 - 2020/09/09/ PY - 2020/06/30/received PY - 2020/08/12/revised PY - 2020/09/04/accepted PY - 2020/9/30/pubmed PY - 2020/11/24/medline PY - 2020/9/29/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Healthcare workers KW - Hospital-acquired infection KW - Personal protective equipment KW - SARS-CoV-2 SP - 120 EP - 122 JF - Journal of infection and chemotherapy : official journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy JO - J Infect Chemother VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Information on the effectiveness of personal protective equipment (PPE) for preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among healthcare workers (HCWs), especially among HCWs with frequent contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2, is limited. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study on 49 HCWs who worked in close contact with patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. HCWs had blood samples taken every 2 weeks to test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using two different types of assay. RESULTS: Forty-nine participants (31 nurses, 15 doctors, 3 other workers) were enrolled. In total, 112 blood samples are obtained from participants. The median work days in 2 weeks was 9 (interquartile range (IQR): 5-10) days. In a single work day, 30 of the 49 participants (61.5%) had contact with patients with suspected or conformed SARS-CoV-2 at least 8 times, and approximately 60% of participants had more than 10 min of contact with a single patient. The median self-reported compliance to PPE was 90% (IQR: 80-100%). Seven participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); however, none were seropositive for SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody, so the positive ELISA results were assumed to be false-positive. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides evidence that appropriate PPE is sufficient to prevent infection amongHCWs. It is necessary to establish a system that provides a stable supply of PPE for HCWs to perform their duties. SN - 1437-7780 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32988731/Effectiveness_of_personal_protective_equipment_in_preventing_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_2_infection_among_healthcare_workers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1341-321X(20)30326-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -