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Lifetime and Twelve-Month Prevalence, Persistence, and Unmet Treatment Needs of Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorders in African American and U.S. versus Foreign-Born Caribbean Women.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 09 25; 17(19)IJ

Abstract

There is growing diversity within the Black population in the U.S., but limited understanding of ethnic and nativity differences in the mental health treatment needs of Black women. This study examined differences in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, their persistence, and unmet treatment needs among Black women in the U.S. Data were from the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative survey that assessed lifetime and twelve-month mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria, and mental health service use among those meeting disorder criteria. One in three African American women met criteria for a lifetime disorder, compared to one in three Caribbean women born within the U.S. and one in five Caribbean women born outside the U.S. About half of African American women with a lifetime disorder had a persistent psychiatric disorder, compared to two in five Caribbean women born within the U.S. and two in three Caribbean women born outside the U.S. African Americans had more persisting dysthymia and panic disorder and less persisting social phobia compared to foreign-born Caribbean women. Of the three groups, Caribbean women born within the U.S. were most likely to seek mental health treatment during their lifetime. These results demonstrate, despite a lower prevalence of psychiatric disorders in Black women, that there is a great likelihood their disorders will be marked by persistence and underscores the need for culturally specific treatment approaches. As Black immigrants in the United States are increasing in number, adequate mental health services are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Informatics, Decision-Enhancement and Analytic Sciences Center (IDEAS), Veteran Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, UT 84148, USA. Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA.Departments of Epidemiology and Statistics, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. UCLA Center for Bridging Research Innovation, Training and Education for Minority Health Disparities Solutions (BRITE), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.Program for Research on Black Americans, Institute of Social Research, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA.Program for Research on Black Americans, Institute of Social Research, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA. School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.UCLA Center for Bridging Research Innovation, Training and Education for Minority Health Disparities Solutions (BRITE), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Departments of Psychology and Health Policy and Management, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32992680

Citation

Jones, Audrey L., et al. "Lifetime and Twelve-Month Prevalence, Persistence, and Unmet Treatment Needs of Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorders in African American and U.S. Versus Foreign-Born Caribbean Women." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 19, 2020.
Jones AL, Cochran SD, Rafferty J, et al. Lifetime and Twelve-Month Prevalence, Persistence, and Unmet Treatment Needs of Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorders in African American and U.S. versus Foreign-Born Caribbean Women. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17(19).
Jones, A. L., Cochran, S. D., Rafferty, J., Taylor, R. J., & Mays, V. M. (2020). Lifetime and Twelve-Month Prevalence, Persistence, and Unmet Treatment Needs of Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorders in African American and U.S. versus Foreign-Born Caribbean Women. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(19). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197007
Jones AL, et al. Lifetime and Twelve-Month Prevalence, Persistence, and Unmet Treatment Needs of Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorders in African American and U.S. Versus Foreign-Born Caribbean Women. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 09 25;17(19) PubMed PMID: 32992680.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lifetime and Twelve-Month Prevalence, Persistence, and Unmet Treatment Needs of Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorders in African American and U.S. versus Foreign-Born Caribbean Women. AU - Jones,Audrey L, AU - Cochran,Susan D, AU - Rafferty,Jane, AU - Taylor,Robert Joseph, AU - Mays,Vickie M, Y1 - 2020/09/25/ PY - 2020/08/31/received PY - 2020/09/15/revised PY - 2020/09/17/accepted PY - 2020/9/30/entrez PY - 2020/10/1/pubmed PY - 2021/1/6/medline KW - Black lives matter KW - DSM-IV KW - mental health KW - nativity KW - psychopathology KW - race/ethnicity JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 17 IS - 19 N2 - There is growing diversity within the Black population in the U.S., but limited understanding of ethnic and nativity differences in the mental health treatment needs of Black women. This study examined differences in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, their persistence, and unmet treatment needs among Black women in the U.S. Data were from the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative survey that assessed lifetime and twelve-month mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria, and mental health service use among those meeting disorder criteria. One in three African American women met criteria for a lifetime disorder, compared to one in three Caribbean women born within the U.S. and one in five Caribbean women born outside the U.S. About half of African American women with a lifetime disorder had a persistent psychiatric disorder, compared to two in five Caribbean women born within the U.S. and two in three Caribbean women born outside the U.S. African Americans had more persisting dysthymia and panic disorder and less persisting social phobia compared to foreign-born Caribbean women. Of the three groups, Caribbean women born within the U.S. were most likely to seek mental health treatment during their lifetime. These results demonstrate, despite a lower prevalence of psychiatric disorders in Black women, that there is a great likelihood their disorders will be marked by persistence and underscores the need for culturally specific treatment approaches. As Black immigrants in the United States are increasing in number, adequate mental health services are needed. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32992680/Lifetime_and_Twelve_Month_Prevalence_Persistence_and_Unmet_Treatment_Needs_of_Mood_Anxiety_and_Substance_Use_Disorders_in_African_American_and_U_S__versus_Foreign_Born_Caribbean_Women_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph17197007 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -