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COVID-19 and Parent Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza.
Pediatrics. 2020 12; 146(6)Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Evaluate if the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic influences parents' intentions to have their children receive the 2020-2021 seasonal influenza vaccination.

METHODS

In May 2020, we recruited 2164 US parents and guardians of children ages 6 months to 5 years to complete a brief online survey that examined parental behavior and decision-making in response to experimental stimuli and real-world events. We estimated a multivariate multinomial logistic regression (controlling for key demographics) to assess the relationship between a child's 2019-2020 influenza vaccination status and the COVID-19 pandemic's influence on a parent's intentions for their child's 2020-2021 influenza vaccination.

RESULTS

Changes in vaccination intentions significantly differed between parents whose children received the 2019-2020 influenza vaccine compared with those whose children did not (P < .001). Specifically, among parents whose children did not receive the 2019-2020 vaccine, 34% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30%-37%) reported that the COVID-19 pandemic made them less likely to have their child receive the 2020-2021 vaccine. Among those whose children did receive the 2019-2020 vaccine, this figure was just 24% (95% CI: 22%-27%). Conversely, only 21% (95% CI: 18%-24%) of parents whose children did not receive the 2019-2020 vaccine reported that the COVID-19 pandemic made them more likely to have their child receive the 2020-2021 vaccine, compared with 39% (95% CI: 36%-41%) of parents whose children did receive the 2019-2020 vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS

The COVID-19 pandemic alone does not appear sufficient to encourage the uptake of pediatric seasonal influenza vaccination. Instead, the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate polarity in vaccination uptake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social Work, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan; rlsokol@wayne.edu.Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; and. Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32999011

Citation

Sokol, Rebeccah L., and Anna H. Grummon. "COVID-19 and Parent Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza." Pediatrics, vol. 146, no. 6, 2020.
Sokol RL, Grummon AH. COVID-19 and Parent Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza. Pediatrics. 2020;146(6).
Sokol, R. L., & Grummon, A. H. (2020). COVID-19 and Parent Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza. Pediatrics, 146(6). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2020-022871
Sokol RL, Grummon AH. COVID-19 and Parent Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza. Pediatrics. 2020;146(6) PubMed PMID: 32999011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - COVID-19 and Parent Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza. AU - Sokol,Rebeccah L, AU - Grummon,Anna H, Y1 - 2020/09/30/ PY - 2020/09/24/accepted PY - 2020/10/2/pubmed PY - 2020/12/15/medline PY - 2020/10/1/entrez JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 146 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Evaluate if the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic influences parents' intentions to have their children receive the 2020-2021 seasonal influenza vaccination. METHODS: In May 2020, we recruited 2164 US parents and guardians of children ages 6 months to 5 years to complete a brief online survey that examined parental behavior and decision-making in response to experimental stimuli and real-world events. We estimated a multivariate multinomial logistic regression (controlling for key demographics) to assess the relationship between a child's 2019-2020 influenza vaccination status and the COVID-19 pandemic's influence on a parent's intentions for their child's 2020-2021 influenza vaccination. RESULTS: Changes in vaccination intentions significantly differed between parents whose children received the 2019-2020 influenza vaccine compared with those whose children did not (P < .001). Specifically, among parents whose children did not receive the 2019-2020 vaccine, 34% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30%-37%) reported that the COVID-19 pandemic made them less likely to have their child receive the 2020-2021 vaccine. Among those whose children did receive the 2019-2020 vaccine, this figure was just 24% (95% CI: 22%-27%). Conversely, only 21% (95% CI: 18%-24%) of parents whose children did not receive the 2019-2020 vaccine reported that the COVID-19 pandemic made them more likely to have their child receive the 2020-2021 vaccine, compared with 39% (95% CI: 36%-41%) of parents whose children did receive the 2019-2020 vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic alone does not appear sufficient to encourage the uptake of pediatric seasonal influenza vaccination. Instead, the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate polarity in vaccination uptake. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32999011/COVID_19_and_Parent_Intention_to_Vaccinate_Their_Children_Against_Influenza_ L2 - https://publications.aap.org/pediatrics/article-lookup/doi/10.1542/peds.2020-022871 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -