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The metabolic and immunological characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 and their neonates.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2021 Mar; 40(3):565-574.EJ

Abstract

Our aim was to investigate whether SARS-CoV-2 infection raised high risks of late pregnancy complications, and posed health problems in fetuses and neonates. We analyzed the data of COVID-19 pregnant women with COVID-19 during late pregnancy and their neonates. Eleven out of 16 (69%) pregnant women with COVID-19 had ++ or +++ of ketone body in urine. The blood uric acid of pregnant patients was 334 μmol/L (IQR, 269-452). D-dimer and FDP in pregnant patients were 3.32 mg/L (IQR, 2.18-4.21) and 9.6 mg/L (IQR, 5.9-12.4). Results of blood samples collected at birth showed that 16 neonates had leukocytes (15.7 × 109/L (IQR, 13.7-17.2)), neutrophils (11.1 × 109/L (IQR, 9.2-13.2)), CK (401 U/L (IQR, 382-647)), and LDH (445 U/L (IQR, 417-559)). Twenty-four hours after birth, a neonate from COVID-19 woman had fever and positive of SARS-CoV-2 gene. Another woman had strongly positive for SARS-CoV-2 gene (+++) for 4 weeks, and delivered one neonate who had SARS-CoV-2 IgM (46 AU/mL) and IgG (140 AU/mL) on day 1 after birth. In the third trimester, COVID-19 infection in pregnant patients raised high risks of ketonuria, hypercoagulable state, and hyperfibrinolysis, which may lead to severe complications. COVID-19 increased the inflammatory responses of placenta, and fetuses and neonates had potential organ dysregulation and coagulation disorders. There was a potential intrauterine transmission while pregnant women had high titer of SARS-CoV-2, but it is necessary to detect SARS-CoV-2 in the blood cord, placenta, and amniotic fluid to further confirm intrauterine infection of fetuses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology and Genetics, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Institute of Biology and Medicine, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Biology and Genetics, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Institute of Biology and Medicine, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Pediatrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Biology and Genetics, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Institute of Biology and Medicine, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Biology and Genetics, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Institute of Biology and Medicine, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Biology and Genetics, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Institute of Biology and Medicine, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Pediatrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Biology and Genetics, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Institute of Biology and Medicine, College of Life Sciences and Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Pediatrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Pediatrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Obstetrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China.Department of Pediatrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430065, Hubei, China. hb0701@sina.com. Department of Pediatrics, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 99 Zhangzhidong Road, Wuhan, 430060, China. hb0701@sina.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33006691

Citation

Zhou, Jingjiao, et al. "The Metabolic and Immunological Characteristics of Pregnant Women With COVID-19 and Their Neonates." European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 40, no. 3, 2021, pp. 565-574.
Zhou J, Wang Y, Zhao J, et al. The metabolic and immunological characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 and their neonates. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2021;40(3):565-574.
Zhou, J., Wang, Y., Zhao, J., Gu, L., Yang, C., Wang, J., Zhang, H., Tian, Y., Tuo, H., Li, D., Wei, M., & He, B. (2021). The metabolic and immunological characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 and their neonates. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology, 40(3), 565-574. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-020-04033-0
Zhou J, et al. The Metabolic and Immunological Characteristics of Pregnant Women With COVID-19 and Their Neonates. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2021;40(3):565-574. PubMed PMID: 33006691.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The metabolic and immunological characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 and their neonates. AU - Zhou,Jingjiao, AU - Wang,Yudie, AU - Zhao,Juan, AU - Gu,Lixing, AU - Yang,Cheng, AU - Wang,Jun, AU - Zhang,Heng, AU - Tian,Yu, AU - Tuo,Hu, AU - Li,Dan, AU - Wei,Min, AU - He,Bing, Y1 - 2020/10/02/ PY - 2020/04/22/received PY - 2020/09/03/accepted PY - 2020/10/3/pubmed PY - 2021/2/26/medline PY - 2020/10/2/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Immune responses KW - Intrauterine transmission KW - Neonates KW - Pregnancy metabolic complications KW - SARS-CoV-2 SP - 565 EP - 574 JF - European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology JO - Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis VL - 40 IS - 3 N2 - Our aim was to investigate whether SARS-CoV-2 infection raised high risks of late pregnancy complications, and posed health problems in fetuses and neonates. We analyzed the data of COVID-19 pregnant women with COVID-19 during late pregnancy and their neonates. Eleven out of 16 (69%) pregnant women with COVID-19 had ++ or +++ of ketone body in urine. The blood uric acid of pregnant patients was 334 μmol/L (IQR, 269-452). D-dimer and FDP in pregnant patients were 3.32 mg/L (IQR, 2.18-4.21) and 9.6 mg/L (IQR, 5.9-12.4). Results of blood samples collected at birth showed that 16 neonates had leukocytes (15.7 × 109/L (IQR, 13.7-17.2)), neutrophils (11.1 × 109/L (IQR, 9.2-13.2)), CK (401 U/L (IQR, 382-647)), and LDH (445 U/L (IQR, 417-559)). Twenty-four hours after birth, a neonate from COVID-19 woman had fever and positive of SARS-CoV-2 gene. Another woman had strongly positive for SARS-CoV-2 gene (+++) for 4 weeks, and delivered one neonate who had SARS-CoV-2 IgM (46 AU/mL) and IgG (140 AU/mL) on day 1 after birth. In the third trimester, COVID-19 infection in pregnant patients raised high risks of ketonuria, hypercoagulable state, and hyperfibrinolysis, which may lead to severe complications. COVID-19 increased the inflammatory responses of placenta, and fetuses and neonates had potential organ dysregulation and coagulation disorders. There was a potential intrauterine transmission while pregnant women had high titer of SARS-CoV-2, but it is necessary to detect SARS-CoV-2 in the blood cord, placenta, and amniotic fluid to further confirm intrauterine infection of fetuses. SN - 1435-4373 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33006691/The_metabolic_and_immunological_characteristics_of_pregnant_women_with_COVID_19_and_their_neonates_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-020-04033-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -