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Pregnant women's use of e-cigarettes in the UK: a cross-sectional survey.
BJOG. 2021 05; 128(6):984-993.BJOG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate prevalence of vaping in pregnancy. Compare characteristics and attitudes between exclusive smokers and vapers, and between exclusive vapers and dual users (smoke and vape).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING

Hospitals across England and Scotland.

POPULATION

Pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2017.

METHODS

Women at 8-24 weeks' gestation completed screening questions about their smoking and vaping. Current or recent ex-smokers and/or vapers completed a full detailed survey about vaping and smoking.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The prevalence of vaping, characteristics and attitudes of women who vape and/or smoke.

RESULTS

Of 3360 pregnant women who completed screening questions, 515 (15.3%, 95% CI 14.1-16.6) were exclusive smokers, 44 (1.3%, 95% CI 1.0-1.8) exclusive vapers and 118 (3.5%, 95% CI 2.9-4.2) dual users. In total, 867 (25.8%) women completed the full survey; compared with smokers (n = 434), vapers (n = 140) were more likely to hold higher educational qualifications (odds ratio [OR) 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.25). Compared with exclusive vapers (n = 33), dual users (n = 107) were younger (OR 0.91 95% CI 0.85-0.98) and less likely to hold high qualifications (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.20-0.96). Compared with smokers, dual users were more likely to be planning to quit smoking (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.24-4.18). Compared with smokers, vapers were more likely to think vaping was safer than smoking (78.6% versus 36.4%).

CONCLUSIONS

One in 20 pregnant women report vaping, and most also smoke. Dual users are more motivated towards stopping smoking than smokers. Where women have tried but cannot stop smoking, clinicians could encourage them to consider vaping for smoking cessation.

TWEETABLE EXTRACT

One in 20 women report vaping during pregnancy but of those that do vape, most also smoke, despite having intentions to quit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Primary Care Research and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.Division of Epidemiology and Public Health and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, Nottingham City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.Division of Primary Care Research and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.Division of Primary Care Research and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.Population Health Research Institute, St George's, University of London, London, UK. Institute for Social Marketing and Health, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.Usher Institute, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.Division of Primary Care Research and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.Usher Institute, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.Division of Primary Care Research and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.Division of Primary Care Research and UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33012050

Citation

Bowker, K, et al. "Pregnant Women's Use of E-cigarettes in the UK: a Cross-sectional Survey." BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 128, no. 6, 2021, pp. 984-993.
Bowker K, Lewis S, Phillips L, et al. Pregnant women's use of e-cigarettes in the UK: a cross-sectional survey. BJOG. 2021;128(6):984-993.
Bowker, K., Lewis, S., Phillips, L., Orton, S., Ussher, M., Naughton, F., Bauld, L., Coleman, T., Sinclair, L., McRobbie, H., Khan, A., & Cooper, S. (2021). Pregnant women's use of e-cigarettes in the UK: a cross-sectional survey. BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 128(6), 984-993. https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.16553
Bowker K, et al. Pregnant Women's Use of E-cigarettes in the UK: a Cross-sectional Survey. BJOG. 2021;128(6):984-993. PubMed PMID: 33012050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pregnant women's use of e-cigarettes in the UK: a cross-sectional survey. AU - Bowker,K, AU - Lewis,S, AU - Phillips,L, AU - Orton,S, AU - Ussher,M, AU - Naughton,F, AU - Bauld,L, AU - Coleman,T, AU - Sinclair,L, AU - McRobbie,H, AU - Khan,A, AU - Cooper,S, Y1 - 2020/11/08/ PY - 2020/09/24/accepted PY - 2020/10/5/pubmed PY - 2021/5/18/medline PY - 2020/10/4/entrez KW - E-cigarettes KW - pregnancy KW - prevalence KW - smoking KW - vaping SP - 984 EP - 993 JF - BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology JO - BJOG VL - 128 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate prevalence of vaping in pregnancy. Compare characteristics and attitudes between exclusive smokers and vapers, and between exclusive vapers and dual users (smoke and vape). DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Hospitals across England and Scotland. POPULATION: Pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2017. METHODS: Women at 8-24 weeks' gestation completed screening questions about their smoking and vaping. Current or recent ex-smokers and/or vapers completed a full detailed survey about vaping and smoking. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The prevalence of vaping, characteristics and attitudes of women who vape and/or smoke. RESULTS: Of 3360 pregnant women who completed screening questions, 515 (15.3%, 95% CI 14.1-16.6) were exclusive smokers, 44 (1.3%, 95% CI 1.0-1.8) exclusive vapers and 118 (3.5%, 95% CI 2.9-4.2) dual users. In total, 867 (25.8%) women completed the full survey; compared with smokers (n = 434), vapers (n = 140) were more likely to hold higher educational qualifications (odds ratio [OR) 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.25). Compared with exclusive vapers (n = 33), dual users (n = 107) were younger (OR 0.91 95% CI 0.85-0.98) and less likely to hold high qualifications (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.20-0.96). Compared with smokers, dual users were more likely to be planning to quit smoking (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.24-4.18). Compared with smokers, vapers were more likely to think vaping was safer than smoking (78.6% versus 36.4%). CONCLUSIONS: One in 20 pregnant women report vaping, and most also smoke. Dual users are more motivated towards stopping smoking than smokers. Where women have tried but cannot stop smoking, clinicians could encourage them to consider vaping for smoking cessation. TWEETABLE EXTRACT: One in 20 women report vaping during pregnancy but of those that do vape, most also smoke, despite having intentions to quit. SN - 1471-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33012050/Pregnant_women's_use_of_e_cigarettes_in_the_UK:_a_cross_sectional_survey_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.16553 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -