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Reported patterns of vaping to support long-term abstinence from smoking: a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of vapers.
Harm Reduct J. 2020 10 06; 17(1):70.HR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

E-cigarettes are the most popular aid to smoking cessation attempts in England and the USA. This research examined associations between e-cigarette device characteristics and patterns of use, tobacco-smoking relapse, and smoking abstinence.

METHODS

A convenience sample of 371 participants with experience of vaping, and tobacco-smoking abstinence and/or relapse completed an online cross-sectional survey about e-cigarettes. Factors associated with smoking relapse were examined using multiple linear and logistic regression models.

RESULTS

Most participants were self-reported long-term abstinent smokers (86.3%) intending to continue vaping. Most initiated e-cigarette use with a vape pen (45.8%) or cig-a-like (38.7%) before moving onto a tank device (89%). Due to missing data, managed through pairwise deletion, only around 70 participants were included in some of the main analyses. Those using a tank or vape pen appeared less likely to relapse than those using a cig-a-like (tank vs. cig-a-like OR = 0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.64, p = 0.019). There was an inverse association between starting self-reported e-cigarette liquid nicotine concentration and relapse, interacting with device type (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.63-0.99, p = 0.047), suggesting that risk of relapse may have been greater if starting with a low e-cigarette liquid nicotine concentration and/or cig-a-like device. Participants reported moving from tobacco-flavored cig-a-likes to fruit/sweet/food flavors with tank devices.

CONCLUSIONS

Knowledge of how people have successfully maintained tobacco-smoking abstinence using vaping could help other tobacco smokers wishing to quit tobacco smoking through vaping.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK. s.gentry@uea.ac.uk.Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK.Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research, School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London, SE1 0AA, UK.George Davies Centre, Leicester Medical School, University of Leicester, Lancaster Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK.Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33023583

Citation

Gentry, Sarah Victoria, et al. "Reported Patterns of Vaping to Support Long-term Abstinence From Smoking: a Cross-sectional Survey of a Convenience Sample of Vapers." Harm Reduction Journal, vol. 17, no. 1, 2020, p. 70.
Gentry SV, Ward E, Dawkins L, et al. Reported patterns of vaping to support long-term abstinence from smoking: a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of vapers. Harm Reduct J. 2020;17(1):70.
Gentry, S. V., Ward, E., Dawkins, L., Holland, R., & Notley, C. (2020). Reported patterns of vaping to support long-term abstinence from smoking: a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of vapers. Harm Reduction Journal, 17(1), 70. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12954-020-00418-8
Gentry SV, et al. Reported Patterns of Vaping to Support Long-term Abstinence From Smoking: a Cross-sectional Survey of a Convenience Sample of Vapers. Harm Reduct J. 2020 10 6;17(1):70. PubMed PMID: 33023583.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reported patterns of vaping to support long-term abstinence from smoking: a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of vapers. AU - Gentry,Sarah Victoria, AU - Ward,Emma, AU - Dawkins,Lynne, AU - Holland,Richard, AU - Notley,Caitlin, Y1 - 2020/10/06/ PY - 2020/02/06/received PY - 2020/09/24/accepted PY - 2020/10/7/entrez PY - 2020/10/8/pubmed PY - 2021/10/29/medline KW - Cross-sectional survey KW - Smoking relapse KW - e-Cigarettes SP - 70 EP - 70 JF - Harm reduction journal JO - Harm Reduct J VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: E-cigarettes are the most popular aid to smoking cessation attempts in England and the USA. This research examined associations between e-cigarette device characteristics and patterns of use, tobacco-smoking relapse, and smoking abstinence. METHODS: A convenience sample of 371 participants with experience of vaping, and tobacco-smoking abstinence and/or relapse completed an online cross-sectional survey about e-cigarettes. Factors associated with smoking relapse were examined using multiple linear and logistic regression models. RESULTS: Most participants were self-reported long-term abstinent smokers (86.3%) intending to continue vaping. Most initiated e-cigarette use with a vape pen (45.8%) or cig-a-like (38.7%) before moving onto a tank device (89%). Due to missing data, managed through pairwise deletion, only around 70 participants were included in some of the main analyses. Those using a tank or vape pen appeared less likely to relapse than those using a cig-a-like (tank vs. cig-a-like OR = 0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.64, p = 0.019). There was an inverse association between starting self-reported e-cigarette liquid nicotine concentration and relapse, interacting with device type (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.63-0.99, p = 0.047), suggesting that risk of relapse may have been greater if starting with a low e-cigarette liquid nicotine concentration and/or cig-a-like device. Participants reported moving from tobacco-flavored cig-a-likes to fruit/sweet/food flavors with tank devices. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of how people have successfully maintained tobacco-smoking abstinence using vaping could help other tobacco smokers wishing to quit tobacco smoking through vaping. SN - 1477-7517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33023583/Reported_patterns_of_vaping_to_support_long_term_abstinence_from_smoking:_a_cross_sectional_survey_of_a_convenience_sample_of_vapers_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -