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SARS-CoV-2 S1 and N-based serological assays reveal rapid seroconversion and induction of specific antibody response in COVID-19 patients.
Sci Rep. 2020 10 06; 10(1):16561.SR

Abstract

As the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2, continues to spread rapidly around the world, there is a need for well validated serological assays that allow the detection of viral specific antibody responses in COVID-19 patients or recovered individuals. In this study, we established and used multiple indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based serological assays to study the antibody response in COVID-19 patients. In order to validate the assays we determined the cut off values, sensitivity and specificity of the assays using sera collected from pre-pandemic healthy controls, COVID-19 patients at different time points after disease-onset, and seropositive sera to other human coronaviruses (CoVs). The developed SARS-CoV-2 S1 subunit of the spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid (N)-based ELISAs not only showed high specificity and sensitivity but also did not show any cross-reactivity with other CoVs. We also show that all RT-PCR confirmed COVID-19 patients tested in our study developed both virus specific IgM and IgG antibodies as early as week one after disease onset. Our data also suggest that the inclusion of both S1 and N in serological testing would capture as many potential SARS-CoV-2 positive cases as possible than using any of them alone. This is specifically important for tracing contacts and cases and conducting large-scale epidemiological studies to understand the true extent of virus spread in populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Department of Medical Laboratories Technology, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia. Medical Research Center, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Pathogen Genomics Laboratory, Division of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwa, Saudi Arabia. King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Infectious Diseases Department, King Abdullah Medical Complex, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Infectious Diseases Department, King Fahad Hospital, Almadinah Almunwarah, Saudi Arabia.Plan and Research Department, General Directorate of Health Affairs Makkah Region, Ministry of Health, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.College of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunwarah, Saudi Arabia.Center for Genetics and Inherited Diseases, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunwarah, Saudi Arabia.Pathogen Genomics Laboratory, Division of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwa, Saudi Arabia. Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Japan. Nuffield Division of Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NDCLS), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.Vaccines and Immunotherapy Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. amhashem@kau.edu.sa. Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. amhashem@kau.edu.sa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33024213

Citation

Algaissi, Abdullah, et al. "SARS-CoV-2 S1 and N-based Serological Assays Reveal Rapid Seroconversion and Induction of Specific Antibody Response in COVID-19 Patients." Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, 2020, p. 16561.
Algaissi A, Alfaleh MA, Hala S, et al. SARS-CoV-2 S1 and N-based serological assays reveal rapid seroconversion and induction of specific antibody response in COVID-19 patients. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):16561.
Algaissi, A., Alfaleh, M. A., Hala, S., Abujamel, T. S., Alamri, S. S., Almahboub, S. A., Alluhaybi, K. A., Hobani, H. I., Alsulaiman, R. M., AlHarbi, R. H., ElAssouli, M. A., Alhabbab, R. Y., AlSaieedi, A. A., Abdulaal, W. H., Al-Somali, A. A., Alofi, F. S., Khogeer, A. A., Alkayyal, A. A., Mahmoud, A. B., ... Hashem, A. M. (2020). SARS-CoV-2 S1 and N-based serological assays reveal rapid seroconversion and induction of specific antibody response in COVID-19 patients. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 16561. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-73491-5
Algaissi A, et al. SARS-CoV-2 S1 and N-based Serological Assays Reveal Rapid Seroconversion and Induction of Specific Antibody Response in COVID-19 Patients. Sci Rep. 2020 10 6;10(1):16561. PubMed PMID: 33024213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - SARS-CoV-2 S1 and N-based serological assays reveal rapid seroconversion and induction of specific antibody response in COVID-19 patients. AU - Algaissi,Abdullah, AU - Alfaleh,Mohamed A, AU - Hala,Sharif, AU - Abujamel,Turki S, AU - Alamri,Sawsan S, AU - Almahboub,Sarah A, AU - Alluhaybi,Khalid A, AU - Hobani,Haya I, AU - Alsulaiman,Reem M, AU - AlHarbi,Rahaf H, AU - ElAssouli,M-Z Aki, AU - Alhabbab,Rowa Y, AU - AlSaieedi,Ahdab A, AU - Abdulaal,Wesam H, AU - Al-Somali,Afrah A, AU - Alofi,Fadwa S, AU - Khogeer,Asim A, AU - Alkayyal,Almohanad A, AU - Mahmoud,Ahmad Bakur, AU - Almontashiri,Naif A M, AU - Pain,Arnab, AU - Hashem,Anwar M, Y1 - 2020/10/06/ PY - 2020/06/19/received PY - 2020/08/27/accepted PY - 2020/10/7/entrez PY - 2020/10/8/pubmed PY - 2020/10/28/medline SP - 16561 EP - 16561 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - As the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2, continues to spread rapidly around the world, there is a need for well validated serological assays that allow the detection of viral specific antibody responses in COVID-19 patients or recovered individuals. In this study, we established and used multiple indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based serological assays to study the antibody response in COVID-19 patients. In order to validate the assays we determined the cut off values, sensitivity and specificity of the assays using sera collected from pre-pandemic healthy controls, COVID-19 patients at different time points after disease-onset, and seropositive sera to other human coronaviruses (CoVs). The developed SARS-CoV-2 S1 subunit of the spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid (N)-based ELISAs not only showed high specificity and sensitivity but also did not show any cross-reactivity with other CoVs. We also show that all RT-PCR confirmed COVID-19 patients tested in our study developed both virus specific IgM and IgG antibodies as early as week one after disease onset. Our data also suggest that the inclusion of both S1 and N in serological testing would capture as many potential SARS-CoV-2 positive cases as possible than using any of them alone. This is specifically important for tracing contacts and cases and conducting large-scale epidemiological studies to understand the true extent of virus spread in populations. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33024213/SARS_CoV_2_S1_and_N_based_serological_assays_reveal_rapid_seroconversion_and_induction_of_specific_antibody_response_in_COVID_19_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-73491-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -