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Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers.
BMJ Open. 2020 10 10; 10(10):e042030.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aims to assess and compare demographic and psychological factors and sleep status of frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in relation to non-frontline HCWs.

DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS AND OUTCOMES

This cross-sectional study was conducted from 8 April 2020 to 17 April 2020 using an online survey across varied healthcare settings in Oman accruing 1139 HCWs.The primary and secondary outcomes were mental health status and sociodemographic data, respectively. Mental health status was assessed using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21), and insomnia was evaluated by the Insomnia Severity Index. Samples were categorised into the frontline and non-frontline groups. χ2 and t-tests were used to compare groups by demographic data. The Mantel-Haenszel OR was used to compare groups by mental health outcomes adjusted by all sociodemographic factors.

RESULTS

This study included 1139 HCWs working in Oman. While working during the pandemic period, a total of 368 (32.3%), 388 (34.1%), 271 (23.8%) and 211 (18.5%) respondents were reported to have depression, anxiety, stress and insomnia, respectively. HCWs in the frontline group were 1.5 times more likely to report anxiety (OR=1.557, p=0.004), stress (OR=1.506, p=0.016) and insomnia (OR=1.586, p=0.013) as compared with those in the non-frontline group. No significant differences in depression status were found between the frontline and non-frontline groups (p=0.201).

CONCLUSIONS

To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the differential impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on different grades of HCWs. This study suggests that frontline HCWs are disproportionally affected compared to non-frontline HCWs, with managing sleep-wake cycles and anxiety symptoms being highly endorsed among frontline HCWs. As psychosocial interventions are likely to be constrained owing to the pandemic, mental healthcare must first be directed to frontline HCWs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Al Masarra Hospital, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Al Masarra Hospital, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Al Masarra Hospital, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Al Masarra Hospital, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Centre of Studies & Research, Directorate General Planning, and studies, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Centre of Studies & Research, Directorate General Planning, and studies, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Family Medicine & Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.Department of Behavioral Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.Department of Behavioral Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman samir.al-adawi@fulbrightmail.org.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33040019

Citation

Alshekaili, Muna, et al. "Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Across Healthcare Settings in Oman During COVID-19: Frontline Versus Non-frontline Healthcare Workers." BMJ Open, vol. 10, no. 10, 2020, pp. e042030.
Alshekaili M, Hassan W, Al Said N, et al. Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers. BMJ Open. 2020;10(10):e042030.
Alshekaili, M., Hassan, W., Al Said, N., Al Sulaimani, F., Jayapal, S. K., Al-Mawali, A., Chan, M. F., Mahadevan, S., & Al-Adawi, S. (2020). Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers. BMJ Open, 10(10), e042030. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-042030
Alshekaili M, et al. Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Across Healthcare Settings in Oman During COVID-19: Frontline Versus Non-frontline Healthcare Workers. BMJ Open. 2020 10 10;10(10):e042030. PubMed PMID: 33040019.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers. AU - Alshekaili,Muna, AU - Hassan,Walid, AU - Al Said,Nazik, AU - Al Sulaimani,Fatima, AU - Jayapal,Sathish Kumar, AU - Al-Mawali,Adhra, AU - Chan,Moon Fai, AU - Mahadevan,Sangeetha, AU - Al-Adawi,Samir, Y1 - 2020/10/10/ PY - 2020/10/11/entrez PY - 2020/10/12/pubmed PY - 2020/10/30/medline KW - anxiety disorders KW - depression & mood disorders KW - public health KW - quality in health care SP - e042030 EP - e042030 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 10 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess and compare demographic and psychological factors and sleep status of frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in relation to non-frontline HCWs. DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS AND OUTCOMES: This cross-sectional study was conducted from 8 April 2020 to 17 April 2020 using an online survey across varied healthcare settings in Oman accruing 1139 HCWs.The primary and secondary outcomes were mental health status and sociodemographic data, respectively. Mental health status was assessed using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21), and insomnia was evaluated by the Insomnia Severity Index. Samples were categorised into the frontline and non-frontline groups. χ2 and t-tests were used to compare groups by demographic data. The Mantel-Haenszel OR was used to compare groups by mental health outcomes adjusted by all sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: This study included 1139 HCWs working in Oman. While working during the pandemic period, a total of 368 (32.3%), 388 (34.1%), 271 (23.8%) and 211 (18.5%) respondents were reported to have depression, anxiety, stress and insomnia, respectively. HCWs in the frontline group were 1.5 times more likely to report anxiety (OR=1.557, p=0.004), stress (OR=1.506, p=0.016) and insomnia (OR=1.586, p=0.013) as compared with those in the non-frontline group. No significant differences in depression status were found between the frontline and non-frontline groups (p=0.201). CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the differential impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on different grades of HCWs. This study suggests that frontline HCWs are disproportionally affected compared to non-frontline HCWs, with managing sleep-wake cycles and anxiety symptoms being highly endorsed among frontline HCWs. As psychosocial interventions are likely to be constrained owing to the pandemic, mental healthcare must first be directed to frontline HCWs. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33040019/Factors_associated_with_mental_health_outcomes_across_healthcare_settings_in_Oman_during_COVID_19:_frontline_versus_non_frontline_healthcare_workers_ L2 - https://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=33040019 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -