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Beyond maternal education: Socio-economic inequalities in children's diet in the ABCD cohort.
PLoS One. 2020; 15(10):e0240423.Plos

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined whether the role of maternal education in children's unhealthy snacking diet is moderated by other socio-economic indicators.

METHODS

Participants were selected from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort, a large ongoing community-based birth cohort. Validated Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ) (n = 2782) were filled in by mothers of children aged 5.7±0.5yrs. Based on these FFQs, a snacking dietary pattern was derived using Principal Component Analysis. Socio-economic indicators were: maternal and paternal education (low, middle, high; based on the highest education completed) household finance (low, high; based on ability to save money) and neighbourhood SES (composite score including educational level, household income and employment status of residents per postal code). Cross-sectional multivariable linear regression analysis was used to assess the association and possible moderation of maternal education and other socio-economic indicators on the snacking pattern score. Analyses were adjusted for children's age, sex and ethnicity.

RESULTS

Low maternal education (B 0.95, 95% CI 0.83;1.06), low paternal education (B 0.36, 95% CI 0.20;0.52), lower household finance (B 0.18, 95% CI 0.11;0.26) and neighbourhood SES (B -0.09, 95% CI -0.11;-0.06) were independently associated with higher snacking pattern scores (p<0.001). The association between maternal education and the snacking pattern score was somewhat moderated by household finance (p = 0.089) but remained strong. Children from middle-high educated mothers (B 0.44, 95% CI 0.35;0.52) had higher snacking pattern scores when household finance was low (B 0.49, 95% CI 0.33;0.65).

CONCLUSIONS

All socio-economic indicators were associated with increased risk of unhealthy dietary patterns in young children, with low maternal education conferring the highest risk. Yet, within the group of middle-high educated mothers, lower household finance was an extra risk factor for unhealthy dietary patterns. Intervention strategies should therefore focus on lower educated mothers and middle-high educated mothers with insufficient levels of household finance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department Nutrition & Dietetics, Internal Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Epidemiology, Health Promotion and Health Care Innovation, Public Health Service Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Sociology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Public Health, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33048970

Citation

Rashid, Viyan, et al. "Beyond Maternal Education: Socio-economic Inequalities in Children's Diet in the ABCD Cohort." PloS One, vol. 15, no. 10, 2020, pp. e0240423.
Rashid V, Weijs PJM, Engberink MF, et al. Beyond maternal education: Socio-economic inequalities in children's diet in the ABCD cohort. PLoS One. 2020;15(10):e0240423.
Rashid, V., Weijs, P. J. M., Engberink, M. F., Verhoeff, A. P., & Nicolaou, M. (2020). Beyond maternal education: Socio-economic inequalities in children's diet in the ABCD cohort. PloS One, 15(10), e0240423. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0240423
Rashid V, et al. Beyond Maternal Education: Socio-economic Inequalities in Children's Diet in the ABCD Cohort. PLoS One. 2020;15(10):e0240423. PubMed PMID: 33048970.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beyond maternal education: Socio-economic inequalities in children's diet in the ABCD cohort. AU - Rashid,Viyan, AU - Weijs,Peter J M, AU - Engberink,Marielle F, AU - Verhoeff,Arnoud P, AU - Nicolaou,Mary, Y1 - 2020/10/13/ PY - 2020/03/18/received PY - 2020/09/27/accepted PY - 2020/10/13/entrez PY - 2020/10/14/pubmed PY - 2020/10/14/medline SP - e0240423 EP - e0240423 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 15 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the role of maternal education in children's unhealthy snacking diet is moderated by other socio-economic indicators. METHODS: Participants were selected from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort, a large ongoing community-based birth cohort. Validated Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ) (n = 2782) were filled in by mothers of children aged 5.7±0.5yrs. Based on these FFQs, a snacking dietary pattern was derived using Principal Component Analysis. Socio-economic indicators were: maternal and paternal education (low, middle, high; based on the highest education completed) household finance (low, high; based on ability to save money) and neighbourhood SES (composite score including educational level, household income and employment status of residents per postal code). Cross-sectional multivariable linear regression analysis was used to assess the association and possible moderation of maternal education and other socio-economic indicators on the snacking pattern score. Analyses were adjusted for children's age, sex and ethnicity. RESULTS: Low maternal education (B 0.95, 95% CI 0.83;1.06), low paternal education (B 0.36, 95% CI 0.20;0.52), lower household finance (B 0.18, 95% CI 0.11;0.26) and neighbourhood SES (B -0.09, 95% CI -0.11;-0.06) were independently associated with higher snacking pattern scores (p<0.001). The association between maternal education and the snacking pattern score was somewhat moderated by household finance (p = 0.089) but remained strong. Children from middle-high educated mothers (B 0.44, 95% CI 0.35;0.52) had higher snacking pattern scores when household finance was low (B 0.49, 95% CI 0.33;0.65). CONCLUSIONS: All socio-economic indicators were associated with increased risk of unhealthy dietary patterns in young children, with low maternal education conferring the highest risk. Yet, within the group of middle-high educated mothers, lower household finance was an extra risk factor for unhealthy dietary patterns. Intervention strategies should therefore focus on lower educated mothers and middle-high educated mothers with insufficient levels of household finance. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33048970/Beyond_maternal_education:_Socio_economic_inequalities_in_children's_diet_in_the_ABCD_cohort_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0240423 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -