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Pathological features of COVID-19-associated lung injury: a preliminary proteomics report based on clinical samples.
Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2020 10 15; 5(1):240.ST

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as a global health emergency due to its association with severe pneumonia and relative high mortality. However, the molecular characteristics and pathological features underlying COVID-19 pneumonia remain largely unknown. To characterize molecular mechanisms underlying COVID-19 pathogenesis in the lung tissue using a proteomic approach, fresh lung tissues were obtained from newly deceased patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. After virus inactivation, a quantitative proteomic approach combined with bioinformatics analysis was used to detect proteomic changes in the SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues. We identified significant differentially expressed proteins involved in a variety of fundamental biological processes including cellular metabolism, blood coagulation, immune response, angiogenesis, and cell microenvironment regulation. Several inflammatory factors were upregulated, which was possibly caused by the activation of NF-κB signaling. Extensive dysregulation of the lung proteome in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection was discovered. Our results systematically outlined the molecular pathological features in terms of the lung response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and provided the scientific basis for the therapeutic target that is urgently needed to control the COVID-19 pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Lab, Department of Medical Science Research Center, Translational Medicine Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 100730, Beijing, China.National Engineering Research Center for the Emergency Drug, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 100850, Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing Proteome Research Center, National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing), Beijing Institute of Life Omics, 102206, Beijing, China.Department of Infectious Diseases, Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100069, Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing Proteome Research Center, National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing), Beijing Institute of Life Omics, 102206, Beijing, China.National Engineering Research Center for the Emergency Drug, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 100850, Beijing, China.Institute of NBC Defense, 102205, Beijing, China.Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Lab, Department of Medical Science Research Center, Translational Medicine Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 100730, Beijing, China.Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, Institute of Health Service and Transfusion Medicine, 100850, Beijing, China.Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, Institute of Health Service and Transfusion Medicine, 100850, Beijing, China.National Engineering Research Center for the Emergency Drug, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 100850, Beijing, China.Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Lab, Department of Medical Science Research Center, Translational Medicine Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 100730, Beijing, China.Department of Radiology, Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical of University, 100069, Beijing, China.Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100069, Beijing, China.Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100069, Beijing, China.Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Nanyang Central Hospital, 473000, Henan, China.Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Nanyang Central Hospital, 473000, Henan, China.Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Lab, Department of Medical Science Research Center, Translational Medicine Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 100730, Beijing, China. orthoscience@126.com.Department of Radiology, Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical of University, 100069, Beijing, China. lihongjun00113@126.com.National Engineering Research Center for the Emergency Drug, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 100850, Beijing, China. zhongwu@bmi.ac.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33060566

Citation

Leng, Ling, et al. "Pathological Features of COVID-19-associated Lung Injury: a Preliminary Proteomics Report Based On Clinical Samples." Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, vol. 5, no. 1, 2020, p. 240.
Leng L, Cao R, Ma J, et al. Pathological features of COVID-19-associated lung injury: a preliminary proteomics report based on clinical samples. Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2020;5(1):240.
Leng, L., Cao, R., Ma, J., Mou, D., Zhu, Y., Li, W., Lv, L., Gao, D., Zhang, S., Gong, F., Zhao, L., Qiu, B., Xiang, H., Hu, Z., Feng, Y., Dai, Y., Zhao, J., Wu, Z., Li, H., & Zhong, W. (2020). Pathological features of COVID-19-associated lung injury: a preliminary proteomics report based on clinical samples. Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, 5(1), 240. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41392-020-00355-9
Leng L, et al. Pathological Features of COVID-19-associated Lung Injury: a Preliminary Proteomics Report Based On Clinical Samples. Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2020 10 15;5(1):240. PubMed PMID: 33060566.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pathological features of COVID-19-associated lung injury: a preliminary proteomics report based on clinical samples. AU - Leng,Ling, AU - Cao,Ruiyuan, AU - Ma,Jie, AU - Mou,Danlei, AU - Zhu,Yunping, AU - Li,Wei, AU - Lv,Luye, AU - Gao,Dunqin, AU - Zhang,Shikun, AU - Gong,Feng, AU - Zhao,Lei, AU - Qiu,Bintao, AU - Xiang,Haiping, AU - Hu,Zhongjie, AU - Feng,Yingmei, AU - Dai,Yan, AU - Zhao,Jiang, AU - Wu,Zhihong, AU - Li,Hongjun, AU - Zhong,Wu, Y1 - 2020/10/15/ PY - 2020/07/27/received PY - 2020/09/27/accepted PY - 2020/09/21/revised PY - 2020/10/16/entrez PY - 2020/10/17/pubmed PY - 2020/11/6/medline SP - 240 EP - 240 JF - Signal transduction and targeted therapy JO - Signal Transduct Target Ther VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - The COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as a global health emergency due to its association with severe pneumonia and relative high mortality. However, the molecular characteristics and pathological features underlying COVID-19 pneumonia remain largely unknown. To characterize molecular mechanisms underlying COVID-19 pathogenesis in the lung tissue using a proteomic approach, fresh lung tissues were obtained from newly deceased patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. After virus inactivation, a quantitative proteomic approach combined with bioinformatics analysis was used to detect proteomic changes in the SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues. We identified significant differentially expressed proteins involved in a variety of fundamental biological processes including cellular metabolism, blood coagulation, immune response, angiogenesis, and cell microenvironment regulation. Several inflammatory factors were upregulated, which was possibly caused by the activation of NF-κB signaling. Extensive dysregulation of the lung proteome in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection was discovered. Our results systematically outlined the molecular pathological features in terms of the lung response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and provided the scientific basis for the therapeutic target that is urgently needed to control the COVID-19 pandemic. SN - 2059-3635 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33060566/Pathological_features_of_COVID_19_associated_lung_injury:_a_preliminary_proteomics_report_based_on_clinical_samples_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41392-020-00355-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -