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Plant-Based Diets for Kidney Disease: A Guide for Clinicians.
Am J Kidney Dis. 2021 02; 77(2):287-296.AJ

Abstract

In recent years, a growing body of evidence has emerged on the benefits of plant-based diets for the prevention and treatment of lifestyle diseases. In parallel, data now exist regarding the treatment of chronic kidney disease and its most common complications with this dietary pattern. Improving the nutrient quality of foods consumed by patients by including a higher proportion of plant-based foods while reducing total and animal protein intake may reduce the need for or complement nephroprotective medications, improve kidney disease complications, and perhaps favorably affect disease progression and patient survival. In this In Practice article, we review the available evidence on plant-dominant fiber-rich diet as it relates to kidney disease prevention, chronic kidney disease incidence and progression, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, hypertension, uremic toxins, need for kidney replacement therapy including dialysis, patient satisfaction and quality of life, and mortality. Further, concerns of hyperkalemia and protein inadequacy, which are often associated with plant-based diets, are also reviewed in the context of available evidence. It is likely that the risks for both issues may not have been as significant as previously thought, while the advantages are vast. In conclusion, the risk to benefit ratio of plant-based diets appears to be tilting in favor of their more prevalent use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY; Department of Medicine, NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue, New York, NY. Electronic address: afternoonrounds@gmail.com.Department of Medicine, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY; Department of Medicine, NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue, New York, NY.Division of Nephrology and Hypertension and Kidney Transplantation, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Orange, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33075387

Citation

Joshi, Shivam, et al. "Plant-Based Diets for Kidney Disease: a Guide for Clinicians." American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 77, no. 2, 2021, pp. 287-296.
Joshi S, McMacken M, Kalantar-Zadeh K. Plant-Based Diets for Kidney Disease: A Guide for Clinicians. Am J Kidney Dis. 2021;77(2):287-296.
Joshi, S., McMacken, M., & Kalantar-Zadeh, K. (2021). Plant-Based Diets for Kidney Disease: A Guide for Clinicians. American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 77(2), 287-296. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2020.10.003
Joshi S, McMacken M, Kalantar-Zadeh K. Plant-Based Diets for Kidney Disease: a Guide for Clinicians. Am J Kidney Dis. 2021;77(2):287-296. PubMed PMID: 33075387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plant-Based Diets for Kidney Disease: A Guide for Clinicians. AU - Joshi,Shivam, AU - McMacken,Michelle, AU - Kalantar-Zadeh,Kamyar, Y1 - 2020/10/16/ PY - 2020/05/11/received PY - 2020/10/07/accepted PY - 2020/10/20/pubmed PY - 2020/10/20/medline PY - 2020/10/19/entrez KW - CKD prevention KW - Plant-based diets KW - animal protein KW - chronic kidney disease (CKD) KW - dietary acid load KW - dietary pattern KW - lifestyle KW - modifiable risk factor KW - plant protein KW - plant-based foods KW - renal function KW - review SP - 287 EP - 296 JF - American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation JO - Am J Kidney Dis VL - 77 IS - 2 N2 - In recent years, a growing body of evidence has emerged on the benefits of plant-based diets for the prevention and treatment of lifestyle diseases. In parallel, data now exist regarding the treatment of chronic kidney disease and its most common complications with this dietary pattern. Improving the nutrient quality of foods consumed by patients by including a higher proportion of plant-based foods while reducing total and animal protein intake may reduce the need for or complement nephroprotective medications, improve kidney disease complications, and perhaps favorably affect disease progression and patient survival. In this In Practice article, we review the available evidence on plant-dominant fiber-rich diet as it relates to kidney disease prevention, chronic kidney disease incidence and progression, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, hypertension, uremic toxins, need for kidney replacement therapy including dialysis, patient satisfaction and quality of life, and mortality. Further, concerns of hyperkalemia and protein inadequacy, which are often associated with plant-based diets, are also reviewed in the context of available evidence. It is likely that the risks for both issues may not have been as significant as previously thought, while the advantages are vast. In conclusion, the risk to benefit ratio of plant-based diets appears to be tilting in favor of their more prevalent use. SN - 1523-6838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33075387/Plant_Based_Diets_for_Kidney_Disease:_A_Guide_for_Clinicians_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272-6386(20)31045-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -