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Association between Neighborhood Food Access, Household Income, and Purchase of Snacks and Beverages in the United States.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 10 15; 17(20)IJ

Abstract

Considerable research on the risk factors of obesity and chronic diseases has focused on relationships between where people live, where they shop, and the types of food they purchase. Rarely have investigators used a national sample and explicitly addressed the amount of energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods purchased in different types of neighborhood food stores. Even more rarely have studies accounted for the characteristics of the broader built environment in which food stores are located and which affect the convenience of using neighborhood food stores. We used a large population-based cohort of predominantly white U.S. households from the Nielsen Homescan Consumer Panel 2010 dataset to examine whether there were positive cross-sectional associations between availability of neighborhood convenience stores and supermarkets and self-reported household annual expenditures for snacks and beverages. We examined this relationship separately for poor and non-poor households as defined by the 2010 U.S. federal poverty threshold. We used mixed error-component regression models to examine associations between availability of neighborhood food stores and the expenditures on snacks and beverages, controlling for regional destination accessibility, availability and diversity of neighborhood destinations, and neighborhood street connectivity. In multivariate analyses, we observed that poor households in neighborhoods with few convenience stores purchased more snacks than poor households in neighborhoods with many convenience stores (b = -0.008, p < 0.05). Non-poor households in neighborhoods with many convenience stores and fewer supermarkets purchased more snacks than non-poor households in neighborhoods with few convenience stores and many supermarkets (b = 0.002, p < 0.05 for convenience stores; b = -0.027, p < 0.05 for supermarkets). Increase in number of convenience stores decreased the purchase of snacks by poor households, but increased in non-poor households. On other hand, increase in number of supermarkets discouraged purchase of snacks by non-poor households but had no effect on the purchasing behavior of the poor-households.Therefore, evaluation of access to energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods should include a consideration of geographic proximity. Local governments should consider strategies to expand the availability and access to nutrient-rich food and beverage products in convenience stores for consumers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urban Planning, School of Architecture, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China.Department of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Campus Box 3140, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33076500

Citation

Peng, Ke, and Nikhil Kaza. "Association Between Neighborhood Food Access, Household Income, and Purchase of Snacks and Beverages in the United States." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 20, 2020.
Peng K, Kaza N. Association between Neighborhood Food Access, Household Income, and Purchase of Snacks and Beverages in the United States. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17(20).
Peng, K., & Kaza, N. (2020). Association between Neighborhood Food Access, Household Income, and Purchase of Snacks and Beverages in the United States. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(20). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207517
Peng K, Kaza N. Association Between Neighborhood Food Access, Household Income, and Purchase of Snacks and Beverages in the United States. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 10 15;17(20) PubMed PMID: 33076500.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Neighborhood Food Access, Household Income, and Purchase of Snacks and Beverages in the United States. AU - Peng,Ke, AU - Kaza,Nikhil, Y1 - 2020/10/15/ PY - 2020/08/03/received PY - 2020/09/30/revised PY - 2020/09/30/accepted PY - 2020/10/20/entrez PY - 2020/10/21/pubmed PY - 2021/1/12/medline KW - accessibility KW - convenience stores KW - diversity KW - food availability KW - region KW - street connectivity KW - supermarkets JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 17 IS - 20 N2 - Considerable research on the risk factors of obesity and chronic diseases has focused on relationships between where people live, where they shop, and the types of food they purchase. Rarely have investigators used a national sample and explicitly addressed the amount of energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods purchased in different types of neighborhood food stores. Even more rarely have studies accounted for the characteristics of the broader built environment in which food stores are located and which affect the convenience of using neighborhood food stores. We used a large population-based cohort of predominantly white U.S. households from the Nielsen Homescan Consumer Panel 2010 dataset to examine whether there were positive cross-sectional associations between availability of neighborhood convenience stores and supermarkets and self-reported household annual expenditures for snacks and beverages. We examined this relationship separately for poor and non-poor households as defined by the 2010 U.S. federal poverty threshold. We used mixed error-component regression models to examine associations between availability of neighborhood food stores and the expenditures on snacks and beverages, controlling for regional destination accessibility, availability and diversity of neighborhood destinations, and neighborhood street connectivity. In multivariate analyses, we observed that poor households in neighborhoods with few convenience stores purchased more snacks than poor households in neighborhoods with many convenience stores (b = -0.008, p < 0.05). Non-poor households in neighborhoods with many convenience stores and fewer supermarkets purchased more snacks than non-poor households in neighborhoods with few convenience stores and many supermarkets (b = 0.002, p < 0.05 for convenience stores; b = -0.027, p < 0.05 for supermarkets). Increase in number of convenience stores decreased the purchase of snacks by poor households, but increased in non-poor households. On other hand, increase in number of supermarkets discouraged purchase of snacks by non-poor households but had no effect on the purchasing behavior of the poor-households.Therefore, evaluation of access to energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods should include a consideration of geographic proximity. Local governments should consider strategies to expand the availability and access to nutrient-rich food and beverage products in convenience stores for consumers. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33076500/Association_between_Neighborhood_Food_Access_Household_Income_and_Purchase_of_Snacks_and_Beverages_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph17207517 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -