Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Microbial community successions and their dynamic functions during harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a freshwater lake.
Water Res. 2020 Oct 15; 185:116292.WR

Abstract

The current study reports the community succession of different toxin and non-toxin producing cyanobacteria at different stages of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) and their connectivity with nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in a freshwater lake using an ecogenomics framework. Comprehensive high throughput DNA sequencing, water quality parameter measurements, and functional gene expressions over temporal and spatial scales were employed. Among the cyanobacterial community, the lake was initially dominated by Cyanobium during the months of May, June, and early July, and later primarily by Aphanizomenon and Dolichospermum depicting functional redundancy. Finally, Planktothrix appeared in late August and then the dominance switched to Planktothrix in September. Microcystis aeruginosa and Microcystis panniformis; two species responsible for cyanotoxin production, were also present in August and September, but in significantly smaller relative abundance. MC-LR (0.06-1.32 µg/L) and MC-RR (0.01-0.26 µg/L) were two major types of cyanotoxins detected. The presence of MC-LR and MC-RR were significantly correlated with the Microcystis-related genes (16SMic/mcyA/mcyG) and their expressions (r = 0.33 to 0.8, p < 0.05). The metabolic analyses further linked the presence of different cyanobacterial groups with distinct functions. The nitrogen metabolisms detected a relatively higher abundance of nitrite/nitrate reductase in early summer, indicating significant denitrification activity and the activation of N-fixation in the blooms dominated by Aphanizomenon/Dolichospermum (community richness) during nutrient-limited conditions. The phosphorus and carbohydrate metabolisms detected a trend to initiate a nutrient starvation alert and store nutrients from early summer, while utilizing the stored polyphosphate and carbohydrate (PPX and F6PPK) during the extreme ortho-P scarcity period, mostly in August or September. Specifically, the abundance of Aphanizomenon and Dolichospermum was positively correlated with the nitrogen-fixing nif gene and (p < 0.001) and the PPX enzyme for the stored polyphosphate utilization (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Interestingly, the lake experienced a longer N-fixing period (2-3 months) before non-fixing cyanobacteria (Planktothrix) dominated the entire lake in late summer. The Provo Bay site, which is known to be nutrient-rich historically, had early episodes of filamentous cyanobacteria blooms compared to the rest of the lake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Utah, 110 S. Central Campus Drive, 2000 MCE, Salt Lake City, UT 84121, USA.Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Utah, 110 S. Central Campus Drive, 2000 MCE, Salt Lake City, UT 84121, USA.United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH, USA.Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Utah, 110 S. Central Campus Drive, 2000 MCE, Salt Lake City, UT 84121, USA. Electronic address: ram.goel@utah.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33086464

Citation

Li, Hanyan, et al. "Microbial Community Successions and Their Dynamic Functions During Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms in a Freshwater Lake." Water Research, vol. 185, 2020, p. 116292.
Li H, Barber M, Lu J, et al. Microbial community successions and their dynamic functions during harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a freshwater lake. Water Res. 2020;185:116292.
Li, H., Barber, M., Lu, J., & Goel, R. (2020). Microbial community successions and their dynamic functions during harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a freshwater lake. Water Research, 185, 116292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2020.116292
Li H, et al. Microbial Community Successions and Their Dynamic Functions During Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms in a Freshwater Lake. Water Res. 2020 Oct 15;185:116292. PubMed PMID: 33086464.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbial community successions and their dynamic functions during harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a freshwater lake. AU - Li,Hanyan, AU - Barber,Mike, AU - Lu,Jingrang, AU - Goel,Ramesh, Y1 - 2020/08/11/ PY - 2020/06/25/received PY - 2020/08/08/revised PY - 2020/08/10/accepted PY - 2020/10/22/entrez PY - 2020/10/23/pubmed PY - 2020/10/24/medline KW - Aphanizomenon KW - Cyanobium KW - Cyanotoxins KW - Dolichospermum KW - Harmful algal blooms KW - Nitrogen fixation KW - P Scavenging genes SP - 116292 EP - 116292 JF - Water research JO - Water Res VL - 185 N2 - The current study reports the community succession of different toxin and non-toxin producing cyanobacteria at different stages of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) and their connectivity with nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in a freshwater lake using an ecogenomics framework. Comprehensive high throughput DNA sequencing, water quality parameter measurements, and functional gene expressions over temporal and spatial scales were employed. Among the cyanobacterial community, the lake was initially dominated by Cyanobium during the months of May, June, and early July, and later primarily by Aphanizomenon and Dolichospermum depicting functional redundancy. Finally, Planktothrix appeared in late August and then the dominance switched to Planktothrix in September. Microcystis aeruginosa and Microcystis panniformis; two species responsible for cyanotoxin production, were also present in August and September, but in significantly smaller relative abundance. MC-LR (0.06-1.32 µg/L) and MC-RR (0.01-0.26 µg/L) were two major types of cyanotoxins detected. The presence of MC-LR and MC-RR were significantly correlated with the Microcystis-related genes (16SMic/mcyA/mcyG) and their expressions (r = 0.33 to 0.8, p < 0.05). The metabolic analyses further linked the presence of different cyanobacterial groups with distinct functions. The nitrogen metabolisms detected a relatively higher abundance of nitrite/nitrate reductase in early summer, indicating significant denitrification activity and the activation of N-fixation in the blooms dominated by Aphanizomenon/Dolichospermum (community richness) during nutrient-limited conditions. The phosphorus and carbohydrate metabolisms detected a trend to initiate a nutrient starvation alert and store nutrients from early summer, while utilizing the stored polyphosphate and carbohydrate (PPX and F6PPK) during the extreme ortho-P scarcity period, mostly in August or September. Specifically, the abundance of Aphanizomenon and Dolichospermum was positively correlated with the nitrogen-fixing nif gene and (p < 0.001) and the PPX enzyme for the stored polyphosphate utilization (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Interestingly, the lake experienced a longer N-fixing period (2-3 months) before non-fixing cyanobacteria (Planktothrix) dominated the entire lake in late summer. The Provo Bay site, which is known to be nutrient-rich historically, had early episodes of filamentous cyanobacteria blooms compared to the rest of the lake. SN - 1879-2448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33086464/Microbial_community_successions_and_their_dynamic_functions_during_harmful_cyanobacterial_blooms_in_a_freshwater_lake_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043-1354(20)30828-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -