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Tracking Preschoolers' Lifestyle Behaviors and Testing Maternal Sociodemographics and BMI in Predicting Child Obesity Risk.
J Nutr. 2020 12 10; 150(12):3068-3074.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Longitudinal data investigating tracking of children's lifestyle behaviors and predictors of childhood obesity are limited.

OBJECTIVES

We examined changes in children's lifestyle behaviors (dietary, physical activity, and screen time) from ages 2-5 y to determine if maternal sociodemographic factors and BMI predict child obesity at 3.5 y and 5 y.

METHODS

Data were obtained from 667 first-time mothers who were recruited into the Healthy Beginnings Trial at 24-34 weeks of gestation in Sydney, Australia. Child lifestyle behaviors were assessed using face-to-face questionnaire interviews with mothers. To measure child and maternal anthropometry, BMI (in kg/m2) was calculated using measured height and weight. Children were categorized as overweight or obese based on the International Obesity Task Force criteria. We used 1-factor repeated-measures ANOVA to track preschoolers' lifestyle behaviors and multiple logistic regression to determine obesity predictors.

RESULTS

In children aged 2-5 y, consumption of vegetables (ηp2 = 0.06; P < 0.005) and milk (ηp2 = 0.02; P < 0.001) decreased, whereas physical activity (ηp2 = 0.07; P < 0.001) increased. Discretionary foods (sweet snacks, fast foods, salty snacks, processed meats, confectionary) (ηp2 = 0.03-0.25; P ≤ 0.01) and screen time (ηp2 = 0.39; P < 0.001) increased. Maternal BMI (in kg/m2) (Exp β: 1.06; 95% CI:1.01, 1.12 ; P=0.02), marital status (married/de facto compared with single) (Exp β: 0.06; 95% CI:0.01, 0.26; P < 0.001), and child BMI at 2 y (Exp β: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.46, 2.27; P < 0.001) predicted overweight/obesity at 3.5 y. Child BMI at 3.5 y (Exp β: 3.51; 95% CI: 2.50, 4.93; P < 0.001) predicted obesity at 5 y.

CONCLUSIONS

Poor dietary and lifestyle behaviours track in early childhood, with maternal single-parent status and high maternal and child BMI at 2 y predicting earlier obesity onset.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Health Promotion Service, Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Discipline of Child & Adolescent Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Western Sydney Local Health District, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33096560

Citation

Kunaratnam, Kanita, et al. "Tracking Preschoolers' Lifestyle Behaviors and Testing Maternal Sociodemographics and BMI in Predicting Child Obesity Risk." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 150, no. 12, 2020, pp. 3068-3074.
Kunaratnam K, Halaki M, Wen LM, et al. Tracking Preschoolers' Lifestyle Behaviors and Testing Maternal Sociodemographics and BMI in Predicting Child Obesity Risk. J Nutr. 2020;150(12):3068-3074.
Kunaratnam, K., Halaki, M., Wen, L. M., Baur, L. A., & Flood, V. M. (2020). Tracking Preschoolers' Lifestyle Behaviors and Testing Maternal Sociodemographics and BMI in Predicting Child Obesity Risk. The Journal of Nutrition, 150(12), 3068-3074. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa292
Kunaratnam K, et al. Tracking Preschoolers' Lifestyle Behaviors and Testing Maternal Sociodemographics and BMI in Predicting Child Obesity Risk. J Nutr. 2020 12 10;150(12):3068-3074. PubMed PMID: 33096560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tracking Preschoolers' Lifestyle Behaviors and Testing Maternal Sociodemographics and BMI in Predicting Child Obesity Risk. AU - Kunaratnam,Kanita, AU - Halaki,Mark, AU - Wen,Li M, AU - Baur,Louise A, AU - Flood,Victoria M, PY - 2020/03/27/received PY - 2020/04/20/revised PY - 2020/09/04/accepted PY - 2020/10/24/pubmed PY - 2021/1/28/medline PY - 2020/10/23/entrez KW - Healthy Beginnings Trial KW - childhood obesity KW - lifestyle behaviours KW - mother and child KW - physical activity KW - predictors KW - preschoolers’ diet KW - screen time KW - tracking SP - 3068 EP - 3074 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 150 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Longitudinal data investigating tracking of children's lifestyle behaviors and predictors of childhood obesity are limited. OBJECTIVES: We examined changes in children's lifestyle behaviors (dietary, physical activity, and screen time) from ages 2-5 y to determine if maternal sociodemographic factors and BMI predict child obesity at 3.5 y and 5 y. METHODS: Data were obtained from 667 first-time mothers who were recruited into the Healthy Beginnings Trial at 24-34 weeks of gestation in Sydney, Australia. Child lifestyle behaviors were assessed using face-to-face questionnaire interviews with mothers. To measure child and maternal anthropometry, BMI (in kg/m2) was calculated using measured height and weight. Children were categorized as overweight or obese based on the International Obesity Task Force criteria. We used 1-factor repeated-measures ANOVA to track preschoolers' lifestyle behaviors and multiple logistic regression to determine obesity predictors. RESULTS: In children aged 2-5 y, consumption of vegetables (ηp2 = 0.06; P < 0.005) and milk (ηp2 = 0.02; P < 0.001) decreased, whereas physical activity (ηp2 = 0.07; P < 0.001) increased. Discretionary foods (sweet snacks, fast foods, salty snacks, processed meats, confectionary) (ηp2 = 0.03-0.25; P ≤ 0.01) and screen time (ηp2 = 0.39; P < 0.001) increased. Maternal BMI (in kg/m2) (Exp β: 1.06; 95% CI:1.01, 1.12 ; P=0.02), marital status (married/de facto compared with single) (Exp β: 0.06; 95% CI:0.01, 0.26; P < 0.001), and child BMI at 2 y (Exp β: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.46, 2.27; P < 0.001) predicted overweight/obesity at 3.5 y. Child BMI at 3.5 y (Exp β: 3.51; 95% CI: 2.50, 4.93; P < 0.001) predicted obesity at 5 y. CONCLUSIONS: Poor dietary and lifestyle behaviours track in early childhood, with maternal single-parent status and high maternal and child BMI at 2 y predicting earlier obesity onset. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33096560/Tracking_Preschoolers'_Lifestyle_Behaviors_and_Testing_Maternal_Sociodemographics_and_BMI_in_Predicting_Child_Obesity_Risk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/nxaa292 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -