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Clinical Relevance of Serum Prolactin Levels to Inflammatory Reaction in Male Patients.
Acta Med Okayama. 2020 Oct; 74(5):381-389.AM

Abstract

To clarify the relevance of prolactin (PRL) to clinical parameters in patients who visited our general medicine department, medical records of 353 patients in whom serum PRL levels were measured during the period from 2016 to 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Data for 140 patients (M/F: 42/98) were analyzed after excluding patients lacking detailed records and patients taking dopaminergic agents. Median serum PRL levels were significantly lower in males than females: 6.5 ng/ml (IQR: 4.2-10.3) versus 8.1 ng/ml (5.9-12.9), respectively. Pain and general fatigue were the major symptoms at the first visit, and past histories of hypertension and dyslipidemia were frequent. Male patients with relatively high PRL levels (≥ 10 ng/ml) had significantly lower levels of serum albumin and significantly higher levels of serum LDH than those with low PRL (< 10 ng/ml). There were significant correlations of male PRL level with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (R=0.62), serum LDH level (R=0.39) and serum albumin level (R=-0.52), while the level of serum CRP (R=0.33) showed an insignificant but weak positive correlation with PRL level. Collectively, these results show that PRL levels had gender-specific relevance to various clinical factors, with PRL levels in males being significantly related to inflammatory status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33106693

Citation

Yamamoto, Koichiro, et al. "Clinical Relevance of Serum Prolactin Levels to Inflammatory Reaction in Male Patients." Acta Medica Okayama, vol. 74, no. 5, 2020, pp. 381-389.
Yamamoto K, Hanayama Y, Hasegawa K, et al. Clinical Relevance of Serum Prolactin Levels to Inflammatory Reaction in Male Patients. Acta Med Okayama. 2020;74(5):381-389.
Yamamoto, K., Hanayama, Y., Hasegawa, K., Tokumasu, K., Miyoshi, T., Hagiya, H., Ogawa, H., Obika, M., Itoshima, K., & Otsuka, F. (2020). Clinical Relevance of Serum Prolactin Levels to Inflammatory Reaction in Male Patients. Acta Medica Okayama, 74(5), 381-389. https://doi.org/10.18926/AMO/60797
Yamamoto K, et al. Clinical Relevance of Serum Prolactin Levels to Inflammatory Reaction in Male Patients. Acta Med Okayama. 2020;74(5):381-389. PubMed PMID: 33106693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical Relevance of Serum Prolactin Levels to Inflammatory Reaction in Male Patients. AU - Yamamoto,Koichiro, AU - Hanayama,Yoshihisa, AU - Hasegawa,Kou, AU - Tokumasu,Kazuki, AU - Miyoshi,Tomoko, AU - Hagiya,Hideharu, AU - Ogawa,Hiroko, AU - Obika,Mikako, AU - Itoshima,Koichi, AU - Otsuka,Fumio, PY - 2020/10/27/entrez PY - 2020/10/28/pubmed PY - 2020/10/28/medline KW - hormones KW - hyperprolactinemia KW - inflammation KW - pituitary KW - prolactin SP - 381 EP - 389 JF - Acta medica Okayama JO - Acta Med Okayama VL - 74 IS - 5 N2 - To clarify the relevance of prolactin (PRL) to clinical parameters in patients who visited our general medicine department, medical records of 353 patients in whom serum PRL levels were measured during the period from 2016 to 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Data for 140 patients (M/F: 42/98) were analyzed after excluding patients lacking detailed records and patients taking dopaminergic agents. Median serum PRL levels were significantly lower in males than females: 6.5 ng/ml (IQR: 4.2-10.3) versus 8.1 ng/ml (5.9-12.9), respectively. Pain and general fatigue were the major symptoms at the first visit, and past histories of hypertension and dyslipidemia were frequent. Male patients with relatively high PRL levels (≥ 10 ng/ml) had significantly lower levels of serum albumin and significantly higher levels of serum LDH than those with low PRL (< 10 ng/ml). There were significant correlations of male PRL level with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (R=0.62), serum LDH level (R=0.39) and serum albumin level (R=-0.52), while the level of serum CRP (R=0.33) showed an insignificant but weak positive correlation with PRL level. Collectively, these results show that PRL levels had gender-specific relevance to various clinical factors, with PRL levels in males being significantly related to inflammatory status. SN - 0386-300X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33106693/Clinical_Relevance_of_Serum_Prolactin_Levels_to_Inflammatory_Reaction_in_Male_Patients L2 - https://doi.org/10.18926/AMO/60797 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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