Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Developmental constraint shaped genome evolution and erythrocyte loss in Antarctic fishes following paleoclimate change.
PLoS Genet. 2020 Oct; 16(10):e1009173.PG

Abstract

In the frigid, oxygen-rich Southern Ocean (SO), Antarctic icefishes (Channichthyidae; Notothenioidei) evolved the ability to survive without producing erythrocytes and hemoglobin, the oxygen-transport system of virtually all vertebrates. Here, we integrate paleoclimate records with an extensive phylogenomic dataset of notothenioid fishes to understand the evolution of trait loss associated with climate change. In contrast to buoyancy adaptations in this clade, we find relaxed selection on the genetic regions controlling erythropoiesis evolved only after sustained cooling in the SO. This pattern is seen not only within icefishes but also occurred independently in other high-latitude notothenioids. We show that one species of the red-blooded dragonfish clade evolved a spherocytic anemia that phenocopies human patients with this disease via orthologous mutations. The genomic imprint of SO climate change is biased toward erythrocyte-associated conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) rather than to coding regions, which are largely preserved through pleiotropy. The drift in CNEs is specifically enriched near genes that are preferentially expressed late in erythropoiesis. Furthermore, we find that the hematopoietic marrow of icefish species retained proerythroblasts, which indicates that early erythroid development remains intact. Our results provide a framework for understanding the interactions between development and the genome in shaping the response of species to climate change.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University Marine Science Center, Nahant, MA, United States of America. Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America.Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University Marine Science Center, Nahant, MA, United States of America.Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University Marine Science Center, Nahant, MA, United States of America.Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States of America.Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America.Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University Marine Science Center, Nahant, MA, United States of America. Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33108368

Citation

Daane, Jacob M., et al. "Developmental Constraint Shaped Genome Evolution and Erythrocyte Loss in Antarctic Fishes Following Paleoclimate Change." PLoS Genetics, vol. 16, no. 10, 2020, pp. e1009173.
Daane JM, Auvinet J, Stoebenau A, et al. Developmental constraint shaped genome evolution and erythrocyte loss in Antarctic fishes following paleoclimate change. PLoS Genet. 2020;16(10):e1009173.
Daane, J. M., Auvinet, J., Stoebenau, A., Yergeau, D., Harris, M. P., & Detrich, H. W. (2020). Developmental constraint shaped genome evolution and erythrocyte loss in Antarctic fishes following paleoclimate change. PLoS Genetics, 16(10), e1009173. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1009173
Daane JM, et al. Developmental Constraint Shaped Genome Evolution and Erythrocyte Loss in Antarctic Fishes Following Paleoclimate Change. PLoS Genet. 2020;16(10):e1009173. PubMed PMID: 33108368.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Developmental constraint shaped genome evolution and erythrocyte loss in Antarctic fishes following paleoclimate change. AU - Daane,Jacob M, AU - Auvinet,Juliette, AU - Stoebenau,Alicia, AU - Yergeau,Donald, AU - Harris,Matthew P, AU - Detrich,H William,3rd Y1 - 2020/10/27/ PY - 2020/07/09/received PY - 2020/10/06/accepted PY - 2020/11/12/revised PY - 2020/10/28/pubmed PY - 2020/10/28/medline PY - 2020/10/27/entrez SP - e1009173 EP - e1009173 JF - PLoS genetics JO - PLoS Genet VL - 16 IS - 10 N2 - In the frigid, oxygen-rich Southern Ocean (SO), Antarctic icefishes (Channichthyidae; Notothenioidei) evolved the ability to survive without producing erythrocytes and hemoglobin, the oxygen-transport system of virtually all vertebrates. Here, we integrate paleoclimate records with an extensive phylogenomic dataset of notothenioid fishes to understand the evolution of trait loss associated with climate change. In contrast to buoyancy adaptations in this clade, we find relaxed selection on the genetic regions controlling erythropoiesis evolved only after sustained cooling in the SO. This pattern is seen not only within icefishes but also occurred independently in other high-latitude notothenioids. We show that one species of the red-blooded dragonfish clade evolved a spherocytic anemia that phenocopies human patients with this disease via orthologous mutations. The genomic imprint of SO climate change is biased toward erythrocyte-associated conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) rather than to coding regions, which are largely preserved through pleiotropy. The drift in CNEs is specifically enriched near genes that are preferentially expressed late in erythropoiesis. Furthermore, we find that the hematopoietic marrow of icefish species retained proerythroblasts, which indicates that early erythroid development remains intact. Our results provide a framework for understanding the interactions between development and the genome in shaping the response of species to climate change. SN - 1553-7404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33108368/Developmental_constraint_shaped_genome_evolution_and_erythrocyte_loss_in_Antarctic_fishes_following_paleoclimate_change L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1009173 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.