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Patterns of viral pathogens causing upper respiratory tract infections among symptomatic children in Mwanza, Tanzania.
Sci Rep. 2020 10 28; 10(1):18490.SR

Abstract

Upper-respiratory tract infections (URTI) are the leading causes of childhood morbidities. This study investigated etiologies and patterns of URTI among children in Mwanza, Tanzania. A cross-sectional study involving 339 children was conducted between October-2017 and February-2018. Children with features suggestive of URTI such as nasal congestion, dry cough, painful swallowing and nasal discharge with/without fever were enrolled. Pathogens were detected from nasopharyngeal and ear-swabs by multiplex-PCR and culture respectively. Full blood count and C-reactive protein analysis were also done. The median age was 16 (IQR: 8-34) months. Majority (82.3%) had fever and nasal-congestion (65.5%). Rhinitis (55.9%) was the commonest diagnosis followed by pharyngitis (19.5%). Viruses were isolated in 46% of children, the commonest being Rhinoviruses (23.9%). Nineteen percent of children had more than 2 viruses; Rhinovirus and Enterovirus being the commonest combination. The commonest bacteria isolated from ears were Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Children with viral pathogens had significantly right shift of lymphocytes (73%-sensitivity). Majority (257/339) of children were symptoms free on eighth day. Viruses are the commonest cause of URTI with Rhinitis being the common diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic assays for URTI pathogens are urgently needed in low-income countries to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions which is associated with antibiotic resistance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 65001, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania. mmmirambo@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33116166

Citation

Kwiyolecha, Elizabeth, et al. "Patterns of Viral Pathogens Causing Upper Respiratory Tract Infections Among Symptomatic Children in Mwanza, Tanzania." Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, 2020, p. 18490.
Kwiyolecha E, Groendahl B, Okamo B, et al. Patterns of viral pathogens causing upper respiratory tract infections among symptomatic children in Mwanza, Tanzania. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):18490.
Kwiyolecha, E., Groendahl, B., Okamo, B., Kayange, N., Manyama, F., Kidenya, B. R., Mahamba, D. C., Msanga, D. R., Gehring, S., Majigo, M., Mshana, S. E., & Mirambo, M. M. (2020). Patterns of viral pathogens causing upper respiratory tract infections among symptomatic children in Mwanza, Tanzania. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 18490. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-74555-2
Kwiyolecha E, et al. Patterns of Viral Pathogens Causing Upper Respiratory Tract Infections Among Symptomatic Children in Mwanza, Tanzania. Sci Rep. 2020 10 28;10(1):18490. PubMed PMID: 33116166.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patterns of viral pathogens causing upper respiratory tract infections among symptomatic children in Mwanza, Tanzania. AU - Kwiyolecha,Elizabeth, AU - Groendahl,Britta, AU - Okamo,Bernard, AU - Kayange,Neema, AU - Manyama,Festo, AU - Kidenya,Benson R, AU - Mahamba,Dina C, AU - Msanga,Delfina R, AU - Gehring,Stephan, AU - Majigo,Mtebe, AU - Mshana,Stephen E, AU - Mirambo,Mariam M, Y1 - 2020/10/28/ PY - 2020/07/14/received PY - 2020/10/05/accepted PY - 2020/10/29/entrez PY - 2020/10/30/pubmed PY - 2020/10/30/medline SP - 18490 EP - 18490 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - Upper-respiratory tract infections (URTI) are the leading causes of childhood morbidities. This study investigated etiologies and patterns of URTI among children in Mwanza, Tanzania. A cross-sectional study involving 339 children was conducted between October-2017 and February-2018. Children with features suggestive of URTI such as nasal congestion, dry cough, painful swallowing and nasal discharge with/without fever were enrolled. Pathogens were detected from nasopharyngeal and ear-swabs by multiplex-PCR and culture respectively. Full blood count and C-reactive protein analysis were also done. The median age was 16 (IQR: 8-34) months. Majority (82.3%) had fever and nasal-congestion (65.5%). Rhinitis (55.9%) was the commonest diagnosis followed by pharyngitis (19.5%). Viruses were isolated in 46% of children, the commonest being Rhinoviruses (23.9%). Nineteen percent of children had more than 2 viruses; Rhinovirus and Enterovirus being the commonest combination. The commonest bacteria isolated from ears were Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Children with viral pathogens had significantly right shift of lymphocytes (73%-sensitivity). Majority (257/339) of children were symptoms free on eighth day. Viruses are the commonest cause of URTI with Rhinitis being the common diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic assays for URTI pathogens are urgently needed in low-income countries to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions which is associated with antibiotic resistance. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33116166/Patterns_of_viral_pathogens_causing_upper_respiratory_tract_infections_among_symptomatic_children_in_Mwanza,_Tanzania L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-74555-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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