Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Lung Ultrasound in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections: Viral, Bacterial or COVID-19? A Narrative Review.
Open Access Emerg Med. 2020; 12:275-285.OA

Abstract

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are common complaints among patients presenting to the pediatric emergency department. In the diagnostic assessment of children with RTIs, many patients ultimately undergo imaging studies for further evaluation. Point-of-care lung ultrasound (LUS) can be used safely and with a high degree of accuracy in differentiating etiologies of RTIs in pediatric patients. Ultrasonographical features such as an irregular pleural line, subpleural consolidations, focal and lobar consolidation and signs of interstitial involvement can be used to distinguish between several pathologies. This work offers a comprehensive overview of pediatric LUS in cases of the most common pediatric RTIs including bacterial and viral pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and COVID-19.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Division of Emergency Ultrasound, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.Division of Emergency Ultrasound, Department of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33116963

Citation

Kharasch, Sigmund, et al. "Lung Ultrasound in Children With Respiratory Tract Infections: Viral, Bacterial or COVID-19? a Narrative Review." Open Access Emergency Medicine : OAEM, vol. 12, 2020, pp. 275-285.
Kharasch S, Duggan NM, Cohen AR, et al. Lung Ultrasound in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections: Viral, Bacterial or COVID-19? A Narrative Review. Open Access Emerg Med. 2020;12:275-285.
Kharasch, S., Duggan, N. M., Cohen, A. R., & Shokoohi, H. (2020). Lung Ultrasound in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections: Viral, Bacterial or COVID-19? A Narrative Review. Open Access Emergency Medicine : OAEM, 12, 275-285. https://doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S238702
Kharasch S, et al. Lung Ultrasound in Children With Respiratory Tract Infections: Viral, Bacterial or COVID-19? a Narrative Review. Open Access Emerg Med. 2020;12:275-285. PubMed PMID: 33116963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lung Ultrasound in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections: Viral, Bacterial or COVID-19? A Narrative Review. AU - Kharasch,Sigmund, AU - Duggan,Nicole M, AU - Cohen,Ari R, AU - Shokoohi,Hamid, Y1 - 2020/10/14/ PY - 2020/08/06/received PY - 2020/09/18/accepted PY - 2020/10/29/entrez PY - 2020/10/30/pubmed PY - 2020/10/30/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - bronchiolitis KW - lung KW - pediatric KW - pneumonia KW - ultrasound SP - 275 EP - 285 JF - Open access emergency medicine : OAEM JO - Open Access Emerg Med VL - 12 N2 - Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are common complaints among patients presenting to the pediatric emergency department. In the diagnostic assessment of children with RTIs, many patients ultimately undergo imaging studies for further evaluation. Point-of-care lung ultrasound (LUS) can be used safely and with a high degree of accuracy in differentiating etiologies of RTIs in pediatric patients. Ultrasonographical features such as an irregular pleural line, subpleural consolidations, focal and lobar consolidation and signs of interstitial involvement can be used to distinguish between several pathologies. This work offers a comprehensive overview of pediatric LUS in cases of the most common pediatric RTIs including bacterial and viral pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and COVID-19. SN - 1179-1500 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33116963/Lung_Ultrasound_in_Children_with_Respiratory_Tract_Infections:_Viral,_Bacterial_or_COVID-19_A_Narrative_Review L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S238702 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.