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IP-10 and MCP-1 as biomarkers associated with disease severity of COVID-19.
Mol Med. 2020 10 29; 26(1):97.MM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

COVID-19 is a viral respiratory disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-Coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Patients with this disease may be more prone to venous or arterial thrombosis because of the activation of many factors involved in it, including inflammation, platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. Interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha (MIP1α) are cytokines related to thrombosis. Therefore, this study focused on these three indicators in COVID-19, with the hope to find biomarkers that are associated with patients' outcome.

METHODS

This is a retrospective single-center study involving 74 severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients recruited from the ICU department of the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. The patients were divided into two groups: severe patients and critically ill patients. The serum IP-10, MCP-1 and MIP1α level in both groups was detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and the outcome of COVID-19 patients were retrospectively analyzed.

RESULTS

The serum IP-10 and MCP-1 level in critically ill patients was significantly higher than that in severe patients (P < 0.001). However, no statistical difference in MIP1α between the two groups was found. The analysis of dynamic changes showed that these indicators remarkably increased in patients with poor prognosis. Since the selected patients were severe or critically ill, no significant difference was observed between survival and death.

CONCLUSIONS

IP-10 and MCP-1 are biomarkers associated with the severity of COVID-19 disease and can be related to the risk of death in COVID-19 patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Critical Care Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Infectious Diseases, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China. yongzhelipumch@126.com.Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 1 Shuaifuyuan Road, Beijing, 100730, China. shuyangzhang103@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33121429

Citation

Chen, Yu, et al. "IP-10 and MCP-1 as Biomarkers Associated With Disease Severity of COVID-19." Molecular Medicine (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 26, no. 1, 2020, p. 97.
Chen Y, Wang J, Liu C, et al. IP-10 and MCP-1 as biomarkers associated with disease severity of COVID-19. Mol Med. 2020;26(1):97.
Chen, Y., Wang, J., Liu, C., Su, L., Zhang, D., Fan, J., Yang, Y., Xiao, M., Xie, J., Xu, Y., Li, Y., & Zhang, S. (2020). IP-10 and MCP-1 as biomarkers associated with disease severity of COVID-19. Molecular Medicine (Cambridge, Mass.), 26(1), 97. https://doi.org/10.1186/s10020-020-00230-x
Chen Y, et al. IP-10 and MCP-1 as Biomarkers Associated With Disease Severity of COVID-19. Mol Med. 2020 10 29;26(1):97. PubMed PMID: 33121429.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - IP-10 and MCP-1 as biomarkers associated with disease severity of COVID-19. AU - Chen,Yu, AU - Wang,Jinglan, AU - Liu,Chenxi, AU - Su,Longxiang, AU - Zhang,Dong, AU - Fan,Junping, AU - Yang,Yanli, AU - Xiao,Meng, AU - Xie,Jing, AU - Xu,Yingchun, AU - Li,Yongzhe, AU - Zhang,Shuyang, Y1 - 2020/10/29/ PY - 2020/08/11/received PY - 2020/10/20/accepted PY - 2020/10/30/entrez PY - 2020/10/31/pubmed PY - 2020/11/13/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - Critically ill patients KW - IP-10 KW - MCP-1 SP - 97 EP - 97 JF - Molecular medicine (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Mol Med VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a viral respiratory disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-Coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Patients with this disease may be more prone to venous or arterial thrombosis because of the activation of many factors involved in it, including inflammation, platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. Interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha (MIP1α) are cytokines related to thrombosis. Therefore, this study focused on these three indicators in COVID-19, with the hope to find biomarkers that are associated with patients' outcome. METHODS: This is a retrospective single-center study involving 74 severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients recruited from the ICU department of the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. The patients were divided into two groups: severe patients and critically ill patients. The serum IP-10, MCP-1 and MIP1α level in both groups was detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The clinical symptoms, laboratory test results, and the outcome of COVID-19 patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: The serum IP-10 and MCP-1 level in critically ill patients was significantly higher than that in severe patients (P < 0.001). However, no statistical difference in MIP1α between the two groups was found. The analysis of dynamic changes showed that these indicators remarkably increased in patients with poor prognosis. Since the selected patients were severe or critically ill, no significant difference was observed between survival and death. CONCLUSIONS: IP-10 and MCP-1 are biomarkers associated with the severity of COVID-19 disease and can be related to the risk of death in COVID-19 patients. SN - 1528-3658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33121429/IP_10_and_MCP_1_as_biomarkers_associated_with_disease_severity_of_COVID_19_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1186/s10020-020-00230-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -