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Heritage Language Socialization in Chinese American Immigrant Families: Prospective Links to Children's Heritage Language Proficiency.

Abstract

Though a number of language socialization processes are theorized to promote children's heritage language proficiency (HLP), little research has considered these processes in a single study and examined their prospective relations to multiple domains of HLP in school-age children. In a two-wave longitudinal study of Chinese American children of immigrant parents (N = 258, age = 7-11 years), language socialization processes (e.g., adult HL use at home, parental attitudes towards HL, child participation in HL classes or extracurricular activities) were assessed using parent reports and behavioral observation at Time 1 (1st to 2nd grade). Children's HLP (Cantonese or Mandarin) was assessed using vocabulary and literacy tests at Time 2. Results of structural equation modeling showed that adults' Chinese language use with children at home predicted children's higher Chinese receptive and expressive vocabulary two years later, and children's participation in Chinese language extra-curricular activities predicted their higher Chinese receptive and expressive vocabulary and higher Chinese word reading. By contrast, parental valuing of Chinese language and children's exposure to Chinese media did not predict children's Chinese proficiency. These findings provided support for the benefits of HL use at home and HL classes in promoting HL development in children in immigrant families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wellesley College.University of California, Berkeley.University of California, Davis.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33132738

Citation

Chen, Stephen H., et al. "Heritage Language Socialization in Chinese American Immigrant Families: Prospective Links to Children's Heritage Language Proficiency." International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, vol. 2018, 2018.
Chen SH, Zhou Q, Uchikoshi Y. Heritage Language Socialization in Chinese American Immigrant Families: Prospective Links to Children's Heritage Language Proficiency. Int J Biling Educ Biling. 2018;2018.
Chen, S. H., Zhou, Q., & Uchikoshi, Y. (2018). Heritage Language Socialization in Chinese American Immigrant Families: Prospective Links to Children's Heritage Language Proficiency. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2018.1547680
Chen SH, Zhou Q, Uchikoshi Y. Heritage Language Socialization in Chinese American Immigrant Families: Prospective Links to Children's Heritage Language Proficiency. Int J Biling Educ Biling. 2018;2018 PubMed PMID: 33132738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heritage Language Socialization in Chinese American Immigrant Families: Prospective Links to Children's Heritage Language Proficiency. AU - Chen,Stephen H, AU - Zhou,Qing, AU - Uchikoshi,Yuuko, Y1 - 2018/12/28/ PY - 2020/11/2/entrez PY - 2018/1/1/pubmed PY - 2018/1/1/medline KW - Heritage language proficiency KW - immigrant families KW - language socialization JF - International journal of bilingual education and bilingualism JO - Int J Biling Educ Biling VL - 2018 N2 - Though a number of language socialization processes are theorized to promote children's heritage language proficiency (HLP), little research has considered these processes in a single study and examined their prospective relations to multiple domains of HLP in school-age children. In a two-wave longitudinal study of Chinese American children of immigrant parents (N = 258, age = 7-11 years), language socialization processes (e.g., adult HL use at home, parental attitudes towards HL, child participation in HL classes or extracurricular activities) were assessed using parent reports and behavioral observation at Time 1 (1st to 2nd grade). Children's HLP (Cantonese or Mandarin) was assessed using vocabulary and literacy tests at Time 2. Results of structural equation modeling showed that adults' Chinese language use with children at home predicted children's higher Chinese receptive and expressive vocabulary two years later, and children's participation in Chinese language extra-curricular activities predicted their higher Chinese receptive and expressive vocabulary and higher Chinese word reading. By contrast, parental valuing of Chinese language and children's exposure to Chinese media did not predict children's Chinese proficiency. These findings provided support for the benefits of HL use at home and HL classes in promoting HL development in children in immigrant families. SN - 1367-0050 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33132738/Heritage_Language_Socialization_in_Chinese_American_Immigrant_Families:_Prospective_Links_to_Children's_Heritage_Language_Proficiency_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/33132738/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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