Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Serological Protection 5-6 Years Post Vaccination Against Yellow Fever in African Infants Vaccinated in Routine Programmes.
Front Immunol. 2020; 11:577751.FI

Abstract

Introduction: Although effective live attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccines have been available for over 9 decades sporadic outbreaks continue to occur in endemic regions. These may be linked to several factors including epidemiological factors such as vector and intermediate host distribution or vaccine coverage and efficacy. The World Health Organization's research priorities include gathering systematic evidence around the potential need for booster vaccination with YF vaccine whether this follows full or fractional doses in children. Knowledge on the longevity of response to YF vaccine and the implications of this response needs to be consolidated to guide future vaccination policy.

Methods:

We measured anti-YF IgG by microneutralization assay in a group of 481 African infants who had received YF vaccine as part of routine EPI programmes, to explore serological protection from YF 5-6 years post YF vaccination, as well as the effect of co variates. Findings: Notably, 22.2% of the cohort had undetectable antibody concentrations, with another 7.5% revealing concentrations below the threshold of seropositivity of 0.5 IU/mL. Sex, season, country and time since vaccination did not affect the longevity of antibody concentration or having antibody concentrations above a defined threshold.

Conclusion:

Roughly 30% of children in this cohort did not demonstrate anti-yellow fever antibody concentrations above the defined threshold of protection, with 20% having no demonstrable antibody. Knowledge on the longevity of response to YF vaccine and the implications needs to be consolidated to guide future vaccination policy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vaccines and Immunity Theme, Medical Research Council Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Fajara, Gambia. CIHLMU Center for International Health, Medical Center of the University of Munich (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), Munich, Germany.Centre for Biological Threats and Special Pathogens, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany.Centre pour le Développement des Vaccins, University of Maryland, Bamako, Mali.Centre pour le Développement des Vaccins, University of Maryland, Bamako, Mali.Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Munich, Munich, Germany. German Centre for Infection Research (Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung), Munich, Germany.Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Munich, Munich, Germany. German Centre for Infection Research (Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung), Munich, Germany.Vaccines and Immunity Theme, Medical Research Council Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Fajara, Gambia. The Vaccine Centre, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33133096

Citation

Idoko, Olubukola T., et al. "Serological Protection 5-6 Years Post Vaccination Against Yellow Fever in African Infants Vaccinated in Routine Programmes." Frontiers in Immunology, vol. 11, 2020, p. 577751.
Idoko OT, Domingo C, Tapia MD, et al. Serological Protection 5-6 Years Post Vaccination Against Yellow Fever in African Infants Vaccinated in Routine Programmes. Front Immunol. 2020;11:577751.
Idoko, O. T., Domingo, C., Tapia, M. D., Sow, S. O., Geldmacher, C., Saathoff, E., & Kampmann, B. (2020). Serological Protection 5-6 Years Post Vaccination Against Yellow Fever in African Infants Vaccinated in Routine Programmes. Frontiers in Immunology, 11, 577751. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.577751
Idoko OT, et al. Serological Protection 5-6 Years Post Vaccination Against Yellow Fever in African Infants Vaccinated in Routine Programmes. Front Immunol. 2020;11:577751. PubMed PMID: 33133096.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serological Protection 5-6 Years Post Vaccination Against Yellow Fever in African Infants Vaccinated in Routine Programmes. AU - Idoko,Olubukola T, AU - Domingo,Cristina, AU - Tapia,Milagritos D, AU - Sow,Samba O, AU - Geldmacher,Christof, AU - Saathoff,Elmar, AU - Kampmann,Beate, Y1 - 2020/10/08/ PY - 2020/06/29/received PY - 2020/09/03/accepted PY - 2020/11/2/entrez PY - 2020/11/3/pubmed PY - 2021/6/16/medline KW - 5-6 years post vaccination KW - protection KW - routine immunizations KW - serologic KW - yellow fever SP - 577751 EP - 577751 JF - Frontiers in immunology JO - Front Immunol VL - 11 N2 - Introduction: Although effective live attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccines have been available for over 9 decades sporadic outbreaks continue to occur in endemic regions. These may be linked to several factors including epidemiological factors such as vector and intermediate host distribution or vaccine coverage and efficacy. The World Health Organization's research priorities include gathering systematic evidence around the potential need for booster vaccination with YF vaccine whether this follows full or fractional doses in children. Knowledge on the longevity of response to YF vaccine and the implications of this response needs to be consolidated to guide future vaccination policy. Methods: We measured anti-YF IgG by microneutralization assay in a group of 481 African infants who had received YF vaccine as part of routine EPI programmes, to explore serological protection from YF 5-6 years post YF vaccination, as well as the effect of co variates. Findings: Notably, 22.2% of the cohort had undetectable antibody concentrations, with another 7.5% revealing concentrations below the threshold of seropositivity of 0.5 IU/mL. Sex, season, country and time since vaccination did not affect the longevity of antibody concentration or having antibody concentrations above a defined threshold. Conclusion: Roughly 30% of children in this cohort did not demonstrate anti-yellow fever antibody concentrations above the defined threshold of protection, with 20% having no demonstrable antibody. Knowledge on the longevity of response to YF vaccine and the implications needs to be consolidated to guide future vaccination policy. SN - 1664-3224 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33133096/Serological_Protection_5_6_Years_Post_Vaccination_Against_Yellow_Fever_in_African_Infants_Vaccinated_in_Routine_Programmes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.577751 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -