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Low serum neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels in mildly affected COVID-19 convalescent patients revealed by two different detection methods.
Cell Mol Immunol. 2021 04; 18(4):936-944.CM

Abstract

Neutralizing antibodies targeting the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) block severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entry into cells via surface-expressed angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). We used a surrogate virus neutralization test (sVNT) and SARS-CoV-2 S protein-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector-based neutralization assay (pVNT) to assess the degree to which serum antibodies from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent patients interfere with the binding of SARS-CoV-2 S to ACE2. Both tests revealed neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibodies in the sera of ~90% of mildly and 100% of severely affected COVID-19 convalescent patients. Importantly, sVNT and pVNT results correlated strongly with each other and to the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1 IgG and IgA antibodies. Moreover, levels of neutralizing antibodies correlated with the duration and severity of clinical symptoms but not with patient age. Compared to pVNT, sVNT is less sophisticated and does not require any biosafety labs. Since this assay is also much faster and cheaper, sVNT will not only be important for evaluating the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in a population but also for identifying promising plasma donors for successful passive antibody therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. bosnjak.berislav@mh-hannover.de.Institute of Virology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Virology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Virology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Department of Hematology, Hemostasis, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Transplant Engineering, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Transplant Engineering, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.German Primate Center-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Göttingen, Germany. Faculty of Biology and Psychology, University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.German Primate Center-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Göttingen, Germany. Faculty of Biology and Psychology, University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Public Health Department, Hannover, Germany.Department of Pneumology and German Centre of Lung Research (DZL), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Department of Pneumology and German Centre of Lung Research (DZL), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, Hannover, Germany.German Primate Center-Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Göttingen, Germany. Faculty of Biology and Psychology, University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Transplant Engineering, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Virology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, Hannover, Germany. Cluster of Excellence RESIST (EXC 2155), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. foerster.reinhold@mh-hannover.de. Cluster of Excellence RESIST (EXC 2155), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. foerster.reinhold@mh-hannover.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33139905

Citation

Bošnjak, Berislav, et al. "Low Serum Neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S Antibody Levels in Mildly Affected COVID-19 Convalescent Patients Revealed By Two Different Detection Methods." Cellular & Molecular Immunology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2021, pp. 936-944.
Bošnjak B, Stein SC, Willenzon S, et al. Low serum neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels in mildly affected COVID-19 convalescent patients revealed by two different detection methods. Cell Mol Immunol. 2021;18(4):936-944.
Bošnjak, B., Stein, S. C., Willenzon, S., Cordes, A. K., Puppe, W., Bernhardt, G., Ravens, I., Ritter, C., Schultze-Florey, C. R., Gödecke, N., Martens, J., Kleine-Weber, H., Hoffmann, M., Cossmann, A., Yilmaz, M., Pink, I., Hoeper, M. M., Behrens, G. M. N., Pöhlmann, S., ... Förster, R. (2021). Low serum neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels in mildly affected COVID-19 convalescent patients revealed by two different detection methods. Cellular & Molecular Immunology, 18(4), 936-944. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41423-020-00573-9
Bošnjak B, et al. Low Serum Neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S Antibody Levels in Mildly Affected COVID-19 Convalescent Patients Revealed By Two Different Detection Methods. Cell Mol Immunol. 2021;18(4):936-944. PubMed PMID: 33139905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low serum neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels in mildly affected COVID-19 convalescent patients revealed by two different detection methods. AU - Bošnjak,Berislav, AU - Stein,Saskia Catherina, AU - Willenzon,Stefanie, AU - Cordes,Anne Katrin, AU - Puppe,Wolfram, AU - Bernhardt,Günter, AU - Ravens,Inga, AU - Ritter,Christiane, AU - Schultze-Florey,Christian R, AU - Gödecke,Nina, AU - Martens,Jörg, AU - Kleine-Weber,Hannah, AU - Hoffmann,Markus, AU - Cossmann,Anne, AU - Yilmaz,Mustafa, AU - Pink,Isabelle, AU - Hoeper,Marius M, AU - Behrens,Georg M N, AU - Pöhlmann,Stefan, AU - Blasczyk,Rainer, AU - Schulz,Thomas F, AU - Förster,Reinhold, Y1 - 2020/11/02/ PY - 2020/07/24/received PY - 2020/10/07/accepted PY - 2020/11/4/pubmed PY - 2021/4/23/medline PY - 2020/11/3/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - ELISA KW - Neutralizing antibody KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - Serum SP - 936 EP - 944 JF - Cellular & molecular immunology JO - Cell Mol Immunol VL - 18 IS - 4 N2 - Neutralizing antibodies targeting the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) block severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entry into cells via surface-expressed angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). We used a surrogate virus neutralization test (sVNT) and SARS-CoV-2 S protein-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector-based neutralization assay (pVNT) to assess the degree to which serum antibodies from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent patients interfere with the binding of SARS-CoV-2 S to ACE2. Both tests revealed neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibodies in the sera of ~90% of mildly and 100% of severely affected COVID-19 convalescent patients. Importantly, sVNT and pVNT results correlated strongly with each other and to the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1 IgG and IgA antibodies. Moreover, levels of neutralizing antibodies correlated with the duration and severity of clinical symptoms but not with patient age. Compared to pVNT, sVNT is less sophisticated and does not require any biosafety labs. Since this assay is also much faster and cheaper, sVNT will not only be important for evaluating the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in a population but also for identifying promising plasma donors for successful passive antibody therapy. SN - 2042-0226 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33139905/Low_serum_neutralizing_anti_SARS_CoV_2_S_antibody_levels_in_mildly_affected_COVID_19_convalescent_patients_revealed_by_two_different_detection_methods_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41423-020-00573-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -