Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Lung ultrasound in bronchiolitis.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2021 Jan; 56(1):234-239.PP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Bronchiolitis is the most common acute viral infection of the lower respiratory tract in infants. Clinical severity is associated with different risk factors; however, no clinical, laboratory, or radiological findings are able to predict the course of the disease in full-term infants. Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a valid technique for the diagnosis and evaluation of pediatric respiratory diseases.

AIMS

The aim of our study was to correlate an LUS score with a clinical score, to describe lung ultrasound findings in cases and controls, and to compare LUS findings with chest X-ray (CXR) in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis.

METHODS

We conducted a single-center, longitudinal, prospective study on 92 infants. Sixty-three out of 92 infants were hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis (cases) and twenty-nine out of 92 for diseases not involving the respiratory system (controls). All patients with bronchiolitis underwent a clinical evaluation with the assignment of a clinical severity score and performed lung ultrasound with the assignment of an LUS score. Twenty-three out of 63 infants with bronchiolitis underwent also a CXR for clinical indications. Control infants performed only LUS.

RESULTS

In infants with bronchiolitis LUS score showed a positive correlation with the clinical score (r = .62, p < .001) and the length of hospitalization (r = .42; p < .001). The need of oxygen therapy was more frequent in the patients with higher LUS score (p < .001). LUS findings observed in the cases were the presence of B-lines, subpleural consolidations, and abnormalities of the pleural line. No LUS alterations were observed in the controls. In patients who performed LUS and CXR, we found a correlation between the presence of abnormalities of the pleural line with LUS and the presence of air trapping with CXR (r = .55; p = .007).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Departement of Diagnostic Medicine and Radiology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Department of Maternal Infantile and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33151023

Citation

La Regina, Domenico Paolo, et al. "Lung Ultrasound in Bronchiolitis." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 56, no. 1, 2021, pp. 234-239.
La Regina DP, Bloise S, Pepino D, et al. Lung ultrasound in bronchiolitis. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2021;56(1):234-239.
La Regina, D. P., Bloise, S., Pepino, D., Iovine, E., Laudisa, M., Cristiani, L., Nicolai, A., Nenna, R., Mancino, E., Di Mattia, G., Petrarca, L., Matera, L., Frassanito, A., & Midulla, F. (2021). Lung ultrasound in bronchiolitis. Pediatric Pulmonology, 56(1), 234-239. https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.25156
La Regina DP, et al. Lung Ultrasound in Bronchiolitis. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2021;56(1):234-239. PubMed PMID: 33151023.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lung ultrasound in bronchiolitis. AU - La Regina,Domenico Paolo, AU - Bloise,Silvia, AU - Pepino,Daniela, AU - Iovine,Elio, AU - Laudisa,Marco, AU - Cristiani,Luca, AU - Nicolai,Ambra, AU - Nenna,Raffaella, AU - Mancino,Enrica, AU - Di Mattia,Greta, AU - Petrarca,Laura, AU - Matera,Luigi, AU - Frassanito,Antonella, AU - Midulla,Fabio, Y1 - 2020/11/24/ PY - 2020/07/04/received PY - 2020/09/25/revised PY - 2020/10/26/accepted PY - 2020/11/6/pubmed PY - 2020/11/6/medline PY - 2020/11/5/entrez KW - bronchiolitis KW - infant KW - lung KW - ultrasound SP - 234 EP - 239 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr Pulmonol VL - 56 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis is the most common acute viral infection of the lower respiratory tract in infants. Clinical severity is associated with different risk factors; however, no clinical, laboratory, or radiological findings are able to predict the course of the disease in full-term infants. Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a valid technique for the diagnosis and evaluation of pediatric respiratory diseases. AIMS: The aim of our study was to correlate an LUS score with a clinical score, to describe lung ultrasound findings in cases and controls, and to compare LUS findings with chest X-ray (CXR) in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, longitudinal, prospective study on 92 infants. Sixty-three out of 92 infants were hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis (cases) and twenty-nine out of 92 for diseases not involving the respiratory system (controls). All patients with bronchiolitis underwent a clinical evaluation with the assignment of a clinical severity score and performed lung ultrasound with the assignment of an LUS score. Twenty-three out of 63 infants with bronchiolitis underwent also a CXR for clinical indications. Control infants performed only LUS. RESULTS: In infants with bronchiolitis LUS score showed a positive correlation with the clinical score (r = .62, p < .001) and the length of hospitalization (r = .42; p < .001). The need of oxygen therapy was more frequent in the patients with higher LUS score (p < .001). LUS findings observed in the cases were the presence of B-lines, subpleural consolidations, and abnormalities of the pleural line. No LUS alterations were observed in the controls. In patients who performed LUS and CXR, we found a correlation between the presence of abnormalities of the pleural line with LUS and the presence of air trapping with CXR (r = .55; p = .007). SN - 1099-0496 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33151023/Lung_ultrasound_in_bronchiolitis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.25156 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.