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Anxiety Sensitivity Moderates the Association Between Father-Child Relationship Security and Fear Transmission.
Front Psychol. 2020; 11:579514.FP

Abstract

Observational fear learning can contribute to the development of fear-related psychopathologies, such as anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Observational fear learning is especially relevant during childhood. Parent-child attachment and anxiety sensitivity modulate fear reactions and fear learning but their impact on observational fear learning has not been investigated. This study investigated how these factors contribute to observational fear learning in children. We examined this question among 55 healthy parent-child dyads. Children (8-12 years old) watched a video of their parent undergoing a direct fear conditioning protocol, where one stimulus (CS+Parent) was paired with a shock and one was not (CS-), and a video of a stranger for whom a different stimulus was reinforced (CS+Stranger). Subsequently, all stimuli were presented to children (without shocks) while skin conductance responses were recorded to evaluate fear levels. Our results showed that children more sensitive to anxiety and who had lower father-child relationship security levels exhibited higher skin conductance responses to the CS+Parent. Our data suggest that the father-child relationship security influences vicarious fear transmission in children who are more sensitive to anxiety. This highlights the importance of the father-child relationship security as a potential modulator of children's vulnerability to fear-related psychopathologies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. Research Center of the Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. Research Center of the Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.Research Center of the Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. Department of Neurosciences, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, United States.Department of Psychiatry, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States.Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. Research Center of the Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33162918

Citation

Bilodeau-Houle, Alexe, et al. "Anxiety Sensitivity Moderates the Association Between Father-Child Relationship Security and Fear Transmission." Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 11, 2020, p. 579514.
Bilodeau-Houle A, Bouchard V, Morand-Beaulieu S, et al. Anxiety Sensitivity Moderates the Association Between Father-Child Relationship Security and Fear Transmission. Front Psychol. 2020;11:579514.
Bilodeau-Houle, A., Bouchard, V., Morand-Beaulieu, S., Herringa, R. J., Milad, M. R., & Marin, M. F. (2020). Anxiety Sensitivity Moderates the Association Between Father-Child Relationship Security and Fear Transmission. Frontiers in Psychology, 11, 579514. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.579514
Bilodeau-Houle A, et al. Anxiety Sensitivity Moderates the Association Between Father-Child Relationship Security and Fear Transmission. Front Psychol. 2020;11:579514. PubMed PMID: 33162918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anxiety Sensitivity Moderates the Association Between Father-Child Relationship Security and Fear Transmission. AU - Bilodeau-Houle,Alexe, AU - Bouchard,Valérie, AU - Morand-Beaulieu,Simon, AU - Herringa,Ryan J, AU - Milad,Mohammed R, AU - Marin,Marie-France, Y1 - 2020/10/14/ PY - 2020/07/02/received PY - 2020/09/17/accepted PY - 2020/11/9/entrez PY - 2020/11/10/pubmed PY - 2020/11/10/medline KW - anxiety sensitivity KW - attachment KW - observational fear conditioning KW - parent-child dyads KW - parent-child relationship quality KW - skin conductance response SP - 579514 EP - 579514 JF - Frontiers in psychology JO - Front Psychol VL - 11 N2 - Observational fear learning can contribute to the development of fear-related psychopathologies, such as anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Observational fear learning is especially relevant during childhood. Parent-child attachment and anxiety sensitivity modulate fear reactions and fear learning but their impact on observational fear learning has not been investigated. This study investigated how these factors contribute to observational fear learning in children. We examined this question among 55 healthy parent-child dyads. Children (8-12 years old) watched a video of their parent undergoing a direct fear conditioning protocol, where one stimulus (CS+Parent) was paired with a shock and one was not (CS-), and a video of a stranger for whom a different stimulus was reinforced (CS+Stranger). Subsequently, all stimuli were presented to children (without shocks) while skin conductance responses were recorded to evaluate fear levels. Our results showed that children more sensitive to anxiety and who had lower father-child relationship security levels exhibited higher skin conductance responses to the CS+Parent. Our data suggest that the father-child relationship security influences vicarious fear transmission in children who are more sensitive to anxiety. This highlights the importance of the father-child relationship security as a potential modulator of children's vulnerability to fear-related psychopathologies. SN - 1664-1078 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33162918/Anxiety_Sensitivity_Moderates_the_Association_Between_Father-Child_Relationship_Security_and_Fear_Transmission. L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.579514 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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