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Online learning and COVID-19: a meta-synthesis analysis.
Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2020; 75:e2286.C

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic demanded a quick shift from presential to e-learning processes. Unlike planned e-learning programs, medical schools have had to quickly deliver the entire medical curriculum using remote strategies. This study aimed to perform a meta-synthesis of previous pandemic situations and describe the experience of the São Paulo University School of Medicine. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, EMBASE, Lilacs, Scopus, Web of Science, and ERIC, using the following keywords: ("SARS" OR "severe acute respiratory syndrome" OR "severe acute respiratory syndrome" OR "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus" OR "middle east respiratory syndrome*" OR "MERS-CoV" OR "Mers" OR "Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome*" OR "MERS-CoV*" OR "coronavirus" OR "Coronavirus Infections" OR "coronavirus*" OR "COVID-19" OR "2019-nCoV" OR "SARS-CoV-2") AND ("online education" OR "Education, Distance" OR "e-learning" OR "course online" OR "flipped classroom") AND ("lockdown" OR "social distance" OR "quarantine"). The endpoints were the online platforms used for online learning, the model of class, recorded versus online interaction, duration of online lectures, and students' and teachers' perceptions of online learning. We retrieved 38 records; only seven articles studied online education methods related to the pandemic and social distancing rules. The most frequently used online platform was Zoom®. The studies examined both synchronous and asynchronous approaches. There was no evidence regarding duration and students' and teachers' attitude. This study suggests that the online learning shift was feasible; however, because of the nature of the education shift (pandemic), future studies must further analyze the educational structure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratorio de Cirurgia Plastica e Microgirurgia (LIM-04), Faculdade de Medicina (FMUSP), Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP, BR.Faculdade de Medicina (FMUSP), Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP, BR.Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica, Faculdade de Medicina (FMUSP), Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP, BR.Faculdade de Medicina (FMUSP), Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP, BR.Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica, Faculdade de Medicina (FMUSP), Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP, BR.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33174948

Citation

Camargo, Cristina Pires, et al. "Online Learning and COVID-19: a Meta-synthesis Analysis." Clinics (Sao Paulo, Brazil), vol. 75, 2020, pp. e2286.
Camargo CP, Tempski PZ, Busnardo FF, et al. Online learning and COVID-19: a meta-synthesis analysis. Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2020;75:e2286.
Camargo, C. P., Tempski, P. Z., Busnardo, F. F., Martins, M. A., & Gemperli, R. (2020). Online learning and COVID-19: a meta-synthesis analysis. Clinics (Sao Paulo, Brazil), 75, e2286. https://doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2020/e2286
Camargo CP, et al. Online Learning and COVID-19: a Meta-synthesis Analysis. Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2020;75:e2286. PubMed PMID: 33174948.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Online learning and COVID-19: a meta-synthesis analysis. AU - Camargo,Cristina Pires, AU - Tempski,Patricia Zen, AU - Busnardo,Fabio Freitas, AU - Martins,Milton de Arruda, AU - Gemperli,Rolf, Y1 - 2020/11/06/ PY - 2020/08/20/received PY - 2020/09/10/accepted PY - 2020/11/11/entrez PY - 2020/11/12/pubmed PY - 2020/11/18/medline SP - e2286 EP - e2286 JF - Clinics (Sao Paulo, Brazil) JO - Clinics (Sao Paulo) VL - 75 N2 - The COVID-19 pandemic demanded a quick shift from presential to e-learning processes. Unlike planned e-learning programs, medical schools have had to quickly deliver the entire medical curriculum using remote strategies. This study aimed to perform a meta-synthesis of previous pandemic situations and describe the experience of the São Paulo University School of Medicine. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, EMBASE, Lilacs, Scopus, Web of Science, and ERIC, using the following keywords: ("SARS" OR "severe acute respiratory syndrome" OR "severe acute respiratory syndrome" OR "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus" OR "middle east respiratory syndrome*" OR "MERS-CoV" OR "Mers" OR "Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome*" OR "MERS-CoV*" OR "coronavirus" OR "Coronavirus Infections" OR "coronavirus*" OR "COVID-19" OR "2019-nCoV" OR "SARS-CoV-2") AND ("online education" OR "Education, Distance" OR "e-learning" OR "course online" OR "flipped classroom") AND ("lockdown" OR "social distance" OR "quarantine"). The endpoints were the online platforms used for online learning, the model of class, recorded versus online interaction, duration of online lectures, and students' and teachers' perceptions of online learning. We retrieved 38 records; only seven articles studied online education methods related to the pandemic and social distancing rules. The most frequently used online platform was Zoom®. The studies examined both synchronous and asynchronous approaches. There was no evidence regarding duration and students' and teachers' attitude. This study suggests that the online learning shift was feasible; however, because of the nature of the education shift (pandemic), future studies must further analyze the educational structure. SN - 1980-5322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33174948/Online_learning_and_COVID_19:_a_meta_synthesis_analysis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -