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Plasma Fibrinogen as a Diagnostic Marker of Infection in Patients with Nonunions.
Infect Drug Resist. 2020; 13:4003-4008.ID

Abstract

Background

The timely and accurate diagnosis of infected nonunion is challenging, and there is a need for more efficient biomarkers. Previous studies have shown that fibrinogen plays an important role in mediating inflammation in bacterial infections and, therefore, could be a valuable biomarker for infected nonunion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of plasma fibrinogen and other traditional blood markers for the diagnosis of infected nonunion.

Materials and Methods

We retrospectively studied 146 patients who underwent surgery for primary nonunion between January 2018 and January 2020. The patients were divided into those with infected nonunion (n = 55) and those with aseptic nonunion (n = 91). The preoperatively analyzed parameters were plasma fibrinogen, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and white blood cell (WBC) count. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the biomarkers, and Youden's index was calculated to determine their optimal cut-off values.

Results

The plasma fibrinogen values were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the patients with infected nonunion than in those with aseptic nonunion. ROC curve analysis showed that plasma fibrinogen had a high value of area under the curve (0.816), which indicated that it had good diagnostic ability. Further, at the optimal threshold value of 2.75 g/L, plasma fibrinogen had the highest sensitivity (78.2%; 95% CI = 64.6-87.8) and good specificity (82.4%; 95% CI, 72.7-89.3).

Conclusion

In comparison to the traditional markers of infection, plasma fibrinogen showed good diagnostic ability for the detection of infected nonunion. It may have potential as a practical and cost-efficient biomarker for the diagnosis of infected nonunion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital Clinical College of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. Department of Orthopedics, XuZhou Central Hospital, Xuzhou, People's Republic of China.Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital Clinical College of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Department of Orthopedics, XuZhou Central Hospital, Xuzhou, People's Republic of China.Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital Clinical College of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. Department of Orthopedics, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33177850

Citation

Wang, Xiang-Jin, et al. "Plasma Fibrinogen as a Diagnostic Marker of Infection in Patients With Nonunions." Infection and Drug Resistance, vol. 13, 2020, pp. 4003-4008.
Wang XJ, Wang Z, Zhang ZT, et al. Plasma Fibrinogen as a Diagnostic Marker of Infection in Patients with Nonunions. Infect Drug Resist. 2020;13:4003-4008.
Wang, X. J., Wang, Z., Zhang, Z. T., Qiu, X. S., Chen, M., & Chen, Y. X. (2020). Plasma Fibrinogen as a Diagnostic Marker of Infection in Patients with Nonunions. Infection and Drug Resistance, 13, 4003-4008. https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S269719
Wang XJ, et al. Plasma Fibrinogen as a Diagnostic Marker of Infection in Patients With Nonunions. Infect Drug Resist. 2020;13:4003-4008. PubMed PMID: 33177850.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma Fibrinogen as a Diagnostic Marker of Infection in Patients with Nonunions. AU - Wang,Xiang-Jin, AU - Wang,Zhen, AU - Zhang,Zi-Tao, AU - Qiu,Xu-Sheng, AU - Chen,Ming, AU - Chen,Yi-Xin, Y1 - 2020/11/04/ PY - 2020/06/28/received PY - 2020/09/11/accepted PY - 2020/11/12/entrez PY - 2020/11/13/pubmed PY - 2020/11/13/medline KW - blood biomarkers KW - diagnostic test KW - infected nonunion KW - plasma fibrinogen SP - 4003 EP - 4008 JF - Infection and drug resistance JO - Infect Drug Resist VL - 13 N2 - Background: The timely and accurate diagnosis of infected nonunion is challenging, and there is a need for more efficient biomarkers. Previous studies have shown that fibrinogen plays an important role in mediating inflammation in bacterial infections and, therefore, could be a valuable biomarker for infected nonunion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of plasma fibrinogen and other traditional blood markers for the diagnosis of infected nonunion. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied 146 patients who underwent surgery for primary nonunion between January 2018 and January 2020. The patients were divided into those with infected nonunion (n = 55) and those with aseptic nonunion (n = 91). The preoperatively analyzed parameters were plasma fibrinogen, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and white blood cell (WBC) count. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the biomarkers, and Youden's index was calculated to determine their optimal cut-off values. Results: The plasma fibrinogen values were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the patients with infected nonunion than in those with aseptic nonunion. ROC curve analysis showed that plasma fibrinogen had a high value of area under the curve (0.816), which indicated that it had good diagnostic ability. Further, at the optimal threshold value of 2.75 g/L, plasma fibrinogen had the highest sensitivity (78.2%; 95% CI = 64.6-87.8) and good specificity (82.4%; 95% CI, 72.7-89.3). Conclusion: In comparison to the traditional markers of infection, plasma fibrinogen showed good diagnostic ability for the detection of infected nonunion. It may have potential as a practical and cost-efficient biomarker for the diagnosis of infected nonunion. SN - 1178-6973 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33177850/Plasma_Fibrinogen_as_a_Diagnostic_Marker_of_Infection_in_Patients_with_Nonunions_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S269719 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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