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Potential Cross-Reactive Immunity to SARS-CoV-2 From Common Human Pathogens and Vaccines.
Front Immunol. 2020; 11:586984.FI

Abstract

The recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 causing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is particularly virulent in the elderly while children are largely spared. Here, we explored the potential role of cross-reactive immunity acquired from pediatric vaccinations and exposure to common human pathogens in the protection and pathology of COVID-19. To that end, we sought for peptide matches to SARS-CoV-2 (identity ≥ 80%, in at least eight residues) in the proteomes of 25 human pathogens and in vaccine antigens, and subsequently predicted their T and B cell reactivity to identify potential cross-reactive epitopes. We found that viruses subject to pediatric vaccinations do not contain cross-reactive epitopes with SARS-CoV-2, precluding that they can provide any general protection against COVID-19. Likewise, common viruses including rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and several herpesviruses are also poor or null sources of cross-reactive immunity to SARS-CoV-2, discarding that immunological memory against these viruses can have any general protective or pathological role in COVID-19. In contrast, we found combination vaccines for treating diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis infectious diseases (DTP vaccine) to be significant sources of potential cross-reactive immunity to SARS-CoV-2. DTP cross-reactive epitopes with SARS-CoV-2 include numerous CD8 and CD4 T cell epitopes with broad population protection coverage and potentially neutralizing B cell epitopes in SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein. Worldwide, children receive several DTP vaccinations, including three-four doses the first year of life and one at 4-6 years of age. Moreover, a low antigenic Tdap dose is also given at ages 9-14. Thereby, children may well be protected from SARS-CoV-2 through cross-reactive immunity elicited by DTP vaccinations, supporting testing in the general population to prevent COVID-19.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Immunology & O2, Faculty of Medicine, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33178220

Citation

Reche, Pedro A.. "Potential Cross-Reactive Immunity to SARS-CoV-2 From Common Human Pathogens and Vaccines." Frontiers in Immunology, vol. 11, 2020, p. 586984.
Reche PA. Potential Cross-Reactive Immunity to SARS-CoV-2 From Common Human Pathogens and Vaccines. Front Immunol. 2020;11:586984.
Reche, P. A. (2020). Potential Cross-Reactive Immunity to SARS-CoV-2 From Common Human Pathogens and Vaccines. Frontiers in Immunology, 11, 586984. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.586984
Reche PA. Potential Cross-Reactive Immunity to SARS-CoV-2 From Common Human Pathogens and Vaccines. Front Immunol. 2020;11:586984. PubMed PMID: 33178220.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potential Cross-Reactive Immunity to SARS-CoV-2 From Common Human Pathogens and Vaccines. A1 - Reche,Pedro A, Y1 - 2020/10/16/ PY - 2020/07/24/received PY - 2020/09/25/accepted PY - 2020/11/12/entrez PY - 2020/11/13/pubmed PY - 2020/11/13/medline KW - DTP vaccine KW - coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) KW - cross-reactive immunity KW - epitope KW - severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) SP - 586984 EP - 586984 JF - Frontiers in immunology JO - Front Immunol VL - 11 N2 - The recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 causing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is particularly virulent in the elderly while children are largely spared. Here, we explored the potential role of cross-reactive immunity acquired from pediatric vaccinations and exposure to common human pathogens in the protection and pathology of COVID-19. To that end, we sought for peptide matches to SARS-CoV-2 (identity ≥ 80%, in at least eight residues) in the proteomes of 25 human pathogens and in vaccine antigens, and subsequently predicted their T and B cell reactivity to identify potential cross-reactive epitopes. We found that viruses subject to pediatric vaccinations do not contain cross-reactive epitopes with SARS-CoV-2, precluding that they can provide any general protection against COVID-19. Likewise, common viruses including rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and several herpesviruses are also poor or null sources of cross-reactive immunity to SARS-CoV-2, discarding that immunological memory against these viruses can have any general protective or pathological role in COVID-19. In contrast, we found combination vaccines for treating diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis infectious diseases (DTP vaccine) to be significant sources of potential cross-reactive immunity to SARS-CoV-2. DTP cross-reactive epitopes with SARS-CoV-2 include numerous CD8 and CD4 T cell epitopes with broad population protection coverage and potentially neutralizing B cell epitopes in SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein. Worldwide, children receive several DTP vaccinations, including three-four doses the first year of life and one at 4-6 years of age. Moreover, a low antigenic Tdap dose is also given at ages 9-14. Thereby, children may well be protected from SARS-CoV-2 through cross-reactive immunity elicited by DTP vaccinations, supporting testing in the general population to prevent COVID-19. SN - 1664-3224 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33178220/Potential_Cross_Reactive_Immunity_to_SARS_CoV_2_From_Common_Human_Pathogens_and_Vaccines_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.586984 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -