Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The association between threatened preterm labour and perinatal outcomes at term: a population-based cohort study.
BJOG. 2021 06; 128(7):1145-1150.BJOG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the association between threatened preterm labour (TPTL) and perinatal outcomes of infants born at term.

DESIGN

A population-based cohort study of perinatal outcomes following TPTL <37 weeks of gestation with delivery at term.

SETTING

Nova Scotia, Canada.

POPULATION

All non-anomalous, singleton pregnancies ≥37 weeks of gestation without antepartum haemorrhage from 1988 to 2019.

METHODS

Using data from the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database, TPTL was defined as pregnancies with a hospital admission between 20 and 37 weeks of gestation, with a diagnosis code denoting TPTL with administration of antenatal corticosteroids, or with administration of any tocolysis. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the risk ratios (RR) with 95% CI of maternal and perinatal outcomes in women who had an episode of TPTL relative to those who did not.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Birthweight for gestational age below the tenth centile and a composite of perinatal mortality or severe perinatal morbidity.

RESULTS

Of 256 599 term deliveries meeting the inclusion criteria, 2278 (0.9%) involved TPTL. The risks of the primary outcomes were higher among those with TPTL relative to those without: birthweight for gestational age below the tenth centile (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.11-1.39) and the composite of perinatal mortality/severe perinatal morbidity (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54).

CONCLUSIONS

Although the prevalence of TPTL in term deliveries is low, affected pregnancies are at increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes. Increased fetal surveillance should be considered in the management of pregnancies affected by TPTL.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Moncton, NB, Canada.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33184969

Citation

Gagnon, L C., et al. "The Association Between Threatened Preterm Labour and Perinatal Outcomes at Term: a Population-based Cohort Study." BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 128, no. 7, 2021, pp. 1145-1150.
Gagnon LC, Allen VM, Crane JM, et al. The association between threatened preterm labour and perinatal outcomes at term: a population-based cohort study. BJOG. 2021;128(7):1145-1150.
Gagnon, L. C., Allen, V. M., Crane, J. M., Jangaard, K., Brock, J. A., & Woolcott, C. G. (2021). The association between threatened preterm labour and perinatal outcomes at term: a population-based cohort study. BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 128(7), 1145-1150. https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.16598
Gagnon LC, et al. The Association Between Threatened Preterm Labour and Perinatal Outcomes at Term: a Population-based Cohort Study. BJOG. 2021;128(7):1145-1150. PubMed PMID: 33184969.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association between threatened preterm labour and perinatal outcomes at term: a population-based cohort study. AU - Gagnon,L C, AU - Allen,V M, AU - Crane,J M, AU - Jangaard,K, AU - Brock,J-Ak, AU - Woolcott,C G, Y1 - 2020/11/30/ PY - 2020/11/09/accepted PY - 2020/11/14/pubmed PY - 2021/6/22/medline PY - 2020/11/13/entrez KW - Perinatal epidemiology KW - preterm labour SP - 1145 EP - 1150 JF - BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology JO - BJOG VL - 128 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between threatened preterm labour (TPTL) and perinatal outcomes of infants born at term. DESIGN: A population-based cohort study of perinatal outcomes following TPTL <37 weeks of gestation with delivery at term. SETTING: Nova Scotia, Canada. POPULATION: All non-anomalous, singleton pregnancies ≥37 weeks of gestation without antepartum haemorrhage from 1988 to 2019. METHODS: Using data from the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database, TPTL was defined as pregnancies with a hospital admission between 20 and 37 weeks of gestation, with a diagnosis code denoting TPTL with administration of antenatal corticosteroids, or with administration of any tocolysis. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the risk ratios (RR) with 95% CI of maternal and perinatal outcomes in women who had an episode of TPTL relative to those who did not. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Birthweight for gestational age below the tenth centile and a composite of perinatal mortality or severe perinatal morbidity. RESULTS: Of 256 599 term deliveries meeting the inclusion criteria, 2278 (0.9%) involved TPTL. The risks of the primary outcomes were higher among those with TPTL relative to those without: birthweight for gestational age below the tenth centile (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.11-1.39) and the composite of perinatal mortality/severe perinatal morbidity (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54). CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of TPTL in term deliveries is low, affected pregnancies are at increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes. Increased fetal surveillance should be considered in the management of pregnancies affected by TPTL. SN - 1471-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33184969/The_association_between_threatened_preterm_labour_and_perinatal_outcomes_at_term:_a_population_based_cohort_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.16598 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -