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On the Measurement of Self-Conscious Emotions.
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2021 12; 52(6):1164-1172.CP

Abstract

Self-conscious emotions, like shame and pride, are thought to have an evaluative component in which the self is posited against a set of standards, rules, and goals of society. This study compares the two methods used to examine self-conscious emotions: a self-report questionnaire, the Test of Self-Conscious Affect in Children (TOSCA-C), and a direct observation of behaviors in response to particular tasks, developed by Lewis, Alessandri and Sullivan (1992). 126 young children participated in both tasks at ages 6 and 7. For the observation data, we found that the tendency to be self-evaluative in terms of success were not related to be self-evaluative in failure, and individual consistency across age was found for self-conscious emotions but not for the primary emotions. The questionnaire data showed that children who scored high in shame also scored high in failure, and there were no consistencies across age. There were weak, inconsistent associations between shame measured by the questionnaire technique and sadness observed in the experiment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 89 French Street, Room 1208, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 89 French Street, Room 1208, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA. sp1603@rwjms.rutgers.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33185804

Citation

Park, Paul Sungbae, and Michael Lewis. "On the Measurement of Self-Conscious Emotions." Child Psychiatry and Human Development, vol. 52, no. 6, 2021, pp. 1164-1172.
Park PS, Lewis M. On the Measurement of Self-Conscious Emotions. Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2021;52(6):1164-1172.
Park, P. S., & Lewis, M. (2021). On the Measurement of Self-Conscious Emotions. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 52(6), 1164-1172. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10578-020-01094-2
Park PS, Lewis M. On the Measurement of Self-Conscious Emotions. Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2021;52(6):1164-1172. PubMed PMID: 33185804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - On the Measurement of Self-Conscious Emotions. AU - Park,Paul Sungbae, AU - Lewis,Michael, Y1 - 2020/11/13/ PY - 2020/11/02/accepted PY - 2022/12/01/pmc-release PY - 2020/11/14/pubmed PY - 2021/10/27/medline PY - 2020/11/13/entrez KW - Embarrassment KW - Pride KW - Self-conscious emotions KW - Shame SP - 1164 EP - 1172 JF - Child psychiatry and human development JO - Child Psychiatry Hum Dev VL - 52 IS - 6 N2 - Self-conscious emotions, like shame and pride, are thought to have an evaluative component in which the self is posited against a set of standards, rules, and goals of society. This study compares the two methods used to examine self-conscious emotions: a self-report questionnaire, the Test of Self-Conscious Affect in Children (TOSCA-C), and a direct observation of behaviors in response to particular tasks, developed by Lewis, Alessandri and Sullivan (1992). 126 young children participated in both tasks at ages 6 and 7. For the observation data, we found that the tendency to be self-evaluative in terms of success were not related to be self-evaluative in failure, and individual consistency across age was found for self-conscious emotions but not for the primary emotions. The questionnaire data showed that children who scored high in shame also scored high in failure, and there were no consistencies across age. There were weak, inconsistent associations between shame measured by the questionnaire technique and sadness observed in the experiment. SN - 1573-3327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33185804/On_the_Measurement_of_Self_Conscious_Emotions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10578-020-01094-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -