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Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial.
J Neuroeng Rehabil. 2020 11 13; 17(1):150.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Virtual reality (VR) has been broadly applied in post-stroke rehabilitation. However, studies on occupational performance and self-efficacy as primary outcomes of stroke rehabilitation using VR are lacking. Thus, this study aims to investigate the effects of VR training on occupational performance and self-efficacy in patients with stroke.

METHODS

This was an assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Sixty participants with first-ever stroke (< 1-year onset) underwent rehabilitation in a single acute hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to either the VR group (n = 30) or control group (n = 30). Both groups received dose-matched conventional rehabilitation (i.e., 45 min, five times per week over 3 weeks). The VR group received additional 45-min VR training for five weekdays over 3 weeks. The primary outcome measures were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity, and Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity. The assessment was conducted at baseline and after the 3-week intervention.

RESULTS

A total of 52 participants (86.7%) completed the trial. Significant between-group differences in Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (Median Difference = 8, P = 0.043) and Modified Barthel Index (Median Difference = 10, P = 0.030) were found; however, no significant between-group differences in Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity, and Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity were noted. No serious adverse reactions related to the program were reported.

CONCLUSIONS

Additional VR training could help improve the self-efficacy and activities of daily living of patients with stroke; however, it was not superior to conventional training in the improvement of upper limb functions, occupational performance, and satisfaction. Nevertheless, VR could be integrated into conventional rehabilitation programs to enhance self-efficacy of patients after stroke.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

This study was successfully registered under the title "Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke" on October 13 2019 and could be located in https://www.chictr.org with the study identifier ChiCTR1900026550.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation, Xiangya Hospital Central South University, No. 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, 410008, Hunan, China.Department of Rehabilitation, Xiangya Hospital Central South University, No. 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, 410008, Hunan, China. rangge.ouyang@connect.polyu.hk.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33187532

Citation

Long, Yi, et al. "Effects of Virtual Reality Training On Occupational Performance and Self-efficacy of Patients With Stroke: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 17, no. 1, 2020, p. 150.
Long Y, Ouyang RG, Zhang JQ. Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial. J Neuroeng Rehabil. 2020;17(1):150.
Long, Y., Ouyang, R. G., & Zhang, J. Q. (2020). Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, 17(1), 150. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12984-020-00783-2
Long Y, Ouyang RG, Zhang JQ. Effects of Virtual Reality Training On Occupational Performance and Self-efficacy of Patients With Stroke: a Randomized Controlled Trial. J Neuroeng Rehabil. 2020 11 13;17(1):150. PubMed PMID: 33187532.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Long,Yi, AU - Ouyang,Rang-Ge, AU - Zhang,Jia-Qi, Y1 - 2020/11/13/ PY - 2020/07/14/received PY - 2020/11/06/accepted PY - 2020/11/14/entrez PY - 2020/11/15/pubmed PY - 2021/5/26/medline KW - Occupational performance KW - Rehabilitation KW - Self-efficacy KW - Stroke KW - Virtual reality SP - 150 EP - 150 JF - Journal of neuroengineering and rehabilitation JO - J Neuroeng Rehabil VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) has been broadly applied in post-stroke rehabilitation. However, studies on occupational performance and self-efficacy as primary outcomes of stroke rehabilitation using VR are lacking. Thus, this study aims to investigate the effects of VR training on occupational performance and self-efficacy in patients with stroke. METHODS: This was an assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Sixty participants with first-ever stroke (< 1-year onset) underwent rehabilitation in a single acute hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to either the VR group (n = 30) or control group (n = 30). Both groups received dose-matched conventional rehabilitation (i.e., 45 min, five times per week over 3 weeks). The VR group received additional 45-min VR training for five weekdays over 3 weeks. The primary outcome measures were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity, and Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity. The assessment was conducted at baseline and after the 3-week intervention. RESULTS: A total of 52 participants (86.7%) completed the trial. Significant between-group differences in Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (Median Difference = 8, P = 0.043) and Modified Barthel Index (Median Difference = 10, P = 0.030) were found; however, no significant between-group differences in Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity, and Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity were noted. No serious adverse reactions related to the program were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Additional VR training could help improve the self-efficacy and activities of daily living of patients with stroke; however, it was not superior to conventional training in the improvement of upper limb functions, occupational performance, and satisfaction. Nevertheless, VR could be integrated into conventional rehabilitation programs to enhance self-efficacy of patients after stroke. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was successfully registered under the title "Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke" on October 13 2019 and could be located in https://www.chictr.org with the study identifier ChiCTR1900026550. SN - 1743-0003 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33187532/Effects_of_virtual_reality_training_on_occupational_performance_and_self_efficacy_of_patients_with_stroke:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -