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The association between frequency of e-cigarette use and long-term smoking cessation outcomes among treatment-seeking smokers receiving a behavioral intervention.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2021 01 01; 218:108394.DA

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

A growing body of literature suggests daily, but not non-daily, e-cigarette use is associated with greater odds of quitting combustible cigarettes in the general adult population. However, it is unknown if these findings generalize to treatment-seeking smokers who are receiving a behavioral intervention. Our primary aim was to examine whether frequency of e-cigarette use was associated with subsequent cessation among treatment-seeking smokers who are receiving a behavioral smoking cessation intervention.

METHODS

Participants (N = 2637) enrolled in a RCT of web-based smoking treatments reported their use of e-cigarettes at baseline, 3-, and 6-months. Three groups were created based on e-cigarette use: (1) non-users, (2) intermittent users, and (3) daily users. The primary outcome was complete-case, self-reported 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 12 months.

RESULTS

Compared to non-users, daily e-cigarette users were significantly less likely to be abstinent (21.39 % vs. 29.68 %; p = .006). Quit rates for intermittent users (24.56 %) were not significantly different from non-users (p = .092). Nicotine dependence moderated the results such that among smokers with low nicotine dependence, those who used e-cigarettes (intermittently or daily) were less likely to quit than non-users; these differences were not significant among those with high nicotine dependence. Post hoc analyses indicated that initiating daily e-cigarette use after baseline, but not daily e-cigarette use at baseline, was associated with lower odds of cessation.

CONCLUSIONS

Daily e-cig use may be associated with lower odds of quitting smoking among treatment-seeking smokers, particularly among those with lower nicotine dependence and who initiate daily use after beginning an intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, M3-B232, Seattle, WA 98109, USA. Electronic address: nlwatson@fredhutch.org.Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, M3-B232, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, M3-B232, Seattle, WA 98109, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Washington, 119A Guthrie Hall, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33203525

Citation

Watson, Noreen L., et al. "The Association Between Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Long-term Smoking Cessation Outcomes Among Treatment-seeking Smokers Receiving a Behavioral Intervention." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 218, 2021, p. 108394.
Watson NL, Mull KE, Bricker JB. The association between frequency of e-cigarette use and long-term smoking cessation outcomes among treatment-seeking smokers receiving a behavioral intervention. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2021;218:108394.
Watson, N. L., Mull, K. E., & Bricker, J. B. (2021). The association between frequency of e-cigarette use and long-term smoking cessation outcomes among treatment-seeking smokers receiving a behavioral intervention. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 218, 108394. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.108394
Watson NL, Mull KE, Bricker JB. The Association Between Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Long-term Smoking Cessation Outcomes Among Treatment-seeking Smokers Receiving a Behavioral Intervention. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2021 01 1;218:108394. PubMed PMID: 33203525.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association between frequency of e-cigarette use and long-term smoking cessation outcomes among treatment-seeking smokers receiving a behavioral intervention. AU - Watson,Noreen L, AU - Mull,Kristin E, AU - Bricker,Jonathan B, Y1 - 2020/11/01/ PY - 2020/08/27/received PY - 2020/10/07/revised PY - 2020/10/25/accepted PY - 2020/11/19/pubmed PY - 2021/6/2/medline PY - 2020/11/18/entrez KW - Cigarette smoking KW - Electronic cigarettes KW - Smoking KW - Smoking cessation SP - 108394 EP - 108394 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 218 N2 - INTRODUCTION: A growing body of literature suggests daily, but not non-daily, e-cigarette use is associated with greater odds of quitting combustible cigarettes in the general adult population. However, it is unknown if these findings generalize to treatment-seeking smokers who are receiving a behavioral intervention. Our primary aim was to examine whether frequency of e-cigarette use was associated with subsequent cessation among treatment-seeking smokers who are receiving a behavioral smoking cessation intervention. METHODS: Participants (N = 2637) enrolled in a RCT of web-based smoking treatments reported their use of e-cigarettes at baseline, 3-, and 6-months. Three groups were created based on e-cigarette use: (1) non-users, (2) intermittent users, and (3) daily users. The primary outcome was complete-case, self-reported 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 12 months. RESULTS: Compared to non-users, daily e-cigarette users were significantly less likely to be abstinent (21.39 % vs. 29.68 %; p = .006). Quit rates for intermittent users (24.56 %) were not significantly different from non-users (p = .092). Nicotine dependence moderated the results such that among smokers with low nicotine dependence, those who used e-cigarettes (intermittently or daily) were less likely to quit than non-users; these differences were not significant among those with high nicotine dependence. Post hoc analyses indicated that initiating daily e-cigarette use after baseline, but not daily e-cigarette use at baseline, was associated with lower odds of cessation. CONCLUSIONS: Daily e-cig use may be associated with lower odds of quitting smoking among treatment-seeking smokers, particularly among those with lower nicotine dependence and who initiate daily use after beginning an intervention. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33203525/The_association_between_frequency_of_e_cigarette_use_and_long_term_smoking_cessation_outcomes_among_treatment_seeking_smokers_receiving_a_behavioral_intervention_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(20)30559-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -