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Short communication: Effects of dietary deoiled soy lecithin supplementation on circulating choline and choline metabolites, and the plasma phospholipid profile in Holstein cows fed palm fat.
J Dairy Sci. 2021 Feb; 104(2):1838-1845.JD

Abstract

Dietary lecithin is a source of choline. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of dietary deoiled soy lecithin feeding on circulating choline, choline metabolites, and the plasma phospholipid profile in lactating dairy cows fed fractionated palm fatty acids. In a split-plot Latin square design, 16 Holstein cows (160 ± 7 d in milk; 3.6 ± 1.2 parity) were randomly allocated to a main plot receiving a corn silage and alfalfa haylage-based diet with palm fat containing either moderate or high palmitic acid content at 1.75% of ration dry matter (moderate and high palmitic acid containing 72 or 99% palmitic acid in fat supplement, respectively; n = 8/palm fat diet). Within each palm fat group, deoiled soy lecithin was top-dressed at 0, 0.12, 0.24, or 0.36% of ration dry matter in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 14-d experimental periods. A 14-d covariate period was used to acclimate cows to palm fat feeding without lecithin supplementation. Blood sampling occurred during the final 3 d of each experimental period. Plasma choline and choline metabolites were quantified using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Plasma phospholipids were profiled using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas no effects of treatments were detected for plasma choline or methionine, lecithin feeding increased the plasma concentrations of choline metabolites trimethylamine N-oxide and dimethylglycine (24 and 11%, respectively). Plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM) concentrations increased with deoiled lecithin feeding (e.g., PC 16:0/22:6 and SM d18:1/18:3). Lecithin supplementation also increased plasma lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) concentrations (e.g., LPC 18:0) while reducing plasma phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) concentrations (e.g., PE 16:0/20:5). Although increases in microbial-derived trimethylamine N-oxide suggest gastrointestinal lecithin degradation, elevations in plasma dimethylglycine, PC, LPC, and SM suggest that choline availability was improved by lecithin feeding in cows, thus supporting enhanced endogenous phospholipid synthesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853; State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Beijing Engineering Technology Research Center of Raw Milk Quality and Safety Control, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.Département des Sciences Animales, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada.Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. Electronic address: jwm43@cornell.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33246625

Citation

Wang, F, et al. "Short Communication: Effects of Dietary Deoiled Soy Lecithin Supplementation On Circulating Choline and Choline Metabolites, and the Plasma Phospholipid Profile in Holstein Cows Fed Palm Fat." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 104, no. 2, 2021, pp. 1838-1845.
Wang F, Rico JE, Fontoura ABP, et al. Short communication: Effects of dietary deoiled soy lecithin supplementation on circulating choline and choline metabolites, and the plasma phospholipid profile in Holstein cows fed palm fat. J Dairy Sci. 2021;104(2):1838-1845.
Wang, F., Rico, J. E., Fontoura, A. B. P., Gervais, R., & McFadden, J. W. (2021). Short communication: Effects of dietary deoiled soy lecithin supplementation on circulating choline and choline metabolites, and the plasma phospholipid profile in Holstein cows fed palm fat. Journal of Dairy Science, 104(2), 1838-1845. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2020-18798
Wang F, et al. Short Communication: Effects of Dietary Deoiled Soy Lecithin Supplementation On Circulating Choline and Choline Metabolites, and the Plasma Phospholipid Profile in Holstein Cows Fed Palm Fat. J Dairy Sci. 2021;104(2):1838-1845. PubMed PMID: 33246625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short communication: Effects of dietary deoiled soy lecithin supplementation on circulating choline and choline metabolites, and the plasma phospholipid profile in Holstein cows fed palm fat. AU - Wang,F, AU - Rico,J E, AU - Fontoura,A B P, AU - Gervais,R, AU - McFadden,J W, Y1 - 2020/11/25/ PY - 2020/04/27/received PY - 2020/08/18/accepted PY - 2020/11/29/pubmed PY - 2020/11/29/medline PY - 2020/11/28/entrez KW - choline KW - lecithin KW - palm fat SP - 1838 EP - 1845 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J Dairy Sci VL - 104 IS - 2 N2 - Dietary lecithin is a source of choline. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of dietary deoiled soy lecithin feeding on circulating choline, choline metabolites, and the plasma phospholipid profile in lactating dairy cows fed fractionated palm fatty acids. In a split-plot Latin square design, 16 Holstein cows (160 ± 7 d in milk; 3.6 ± 1.2 parity) were randomly allocated to a main plot receiving a corn silage and alfalfa haylage-based diet with palm fat containing either moderate or high palmitic acid content at 1.75% of ration dry matter (moderate and high palmitic acid containing 72 or 99% palmitic acid in fat supplement, respectively; n = 8/palm fat diet). Within each palm fat group, deoiled soy lecithin was top-dressed at 0, 0.12, 0.24, or 0.36% of ration dry matter in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 14-d experimental periods. A 14-d covariate period was used to acclimate cows to palm fat feeding without lecithin supplementation. Blood sampling occurred during the final 3 d of each experimental period. Plasma choline and choline metabolites were quantified using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Plasma phospholipids were profiled using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas no effects of treatments were detected for plasma choline or methionine, lecithin feeding increased the plasma concentrations of choline metabolites trimethylamine N-oxide and dimethylglycine (24 and 11%, respectively). Plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM) concentrations increased with deoiled lecithin feeding (e.g., PC 16:0/22:6 and SM d18:1/18:3). Lecithin supplementation also increased plasma lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) concentrations (e.g., LPC 18:0) while reducing plasma phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) concentrations (e.g., PE 16:0/20:5). Although increases in microbial-derived trimethylamine N-oxide suggest gastrointestinal lecithin degradation, elevations in plasma dimethylglycine, PC, LPC, and SM suggest that choline availability was improved by lecithin feeding in cows, thus supporting enhanced endogenous phospholipid synthesis. SN - 1525-3198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33246625/Short_communication:_Effects_of_dietary_deoiled_soy_lecithin_supplementation_on_circulating_choline_and_choline_metabolites_and_the_plasma_phospholipid_profile_in_Holstein_cows_fed_palm_fat_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0302(20)30971-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -