Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

RBD-Fc-based COVID-19 vaccine candidate induces highly potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody response.
Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2020 11 27; 5(1):282.ST

Abstract

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has posed serious threats to global health and economy, thus calling for the development of safe and effective vaccines. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for its binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. It contains multiple dominant neutralizing epitopes and serves as an important antigen for the development of COVID-19 vaccines. Here, we showed that immunization of mice with a candidate subunit vaccine consisting of SARS-CoV-2 RBD and Fc fragment of human IgG, as an immunopotentiator, elicited high titer of RBD-specific antibodies with robust neutralizing activity against both pseudotyped and live SARS-CoV-2 infections. The mouse antisera could also effectively neutralize infection by pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 with several natural mutations in RBD and the IgG extracted from the mouse antisera could also show neutralization against pseudotyped SARS-CoV and SARS-related coronavirus (SARSr-CoV). Vaccination of human ACE2 transgenic mice with RBD-Fc could effectively protect mice from the SARS-CoV-2 challenge. These results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 RBD-Fc has good potential to be further developed as an effective and broad-spectrum vaccine to prevent infection of the current SARS-CoV-2 and its mutants, as well as future emerging SARSr-CoVs and re-emerging SARS-CoV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China. lul@fudan.edu.cn.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China. zhyuan@shmu.edu.cn.Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology (MOE/NHC/CAMS), School of Basic Medical Sciences and BSL-3 facility, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China. shibojiang@fudan.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33247109

Citation

Liu, Zezhong, et al. "RBD-Fc-based COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Induces Highly Potent SARS-CoV-2 Neutralizing Antibody Response." Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, vol. 5, no. 1, 2020, p. 282.
Liu Z, Xu W, Xia S, et al. RBD-Fc-based COVID-19 vaccine candidate induces highly potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody response. Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2020;5(1):282.
Liu, Z., Xu, W., Xia, S., Gu, C., Wang, X., Wang, Q., Zhou, J., Wu, Y., Cai, X., Qu, D., Ying, T., Xie, Y., Lu, L., Yuan, Z., & Jiang, S. (2020). RBD-Fc-based COVID-19 vaccine candidate induces highly potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody response. Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, 5(1), 282. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41392-020-00402-5
Liu Z, et al. RBD-Fc-based COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Induces Highly Potent SARS-CoV-2 Neutralizing Antibody Response. Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2020 11 27;5(1):282. PubMed PMID: 33247109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - RBD-Fc-based COVID-19 vaccine candidate induces highly potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody response. AU - Liu,Zezhong, AU - Xu,Wei, AU - Xia,Shuai, AU - Gu,Chenjian, AU - Wang,Xinling, AU - Wang,Qian, AU - Zhou,Jie, AU - Wu,Yanling, AU - Cai,Xia, AU - Qu,Di, AU - Ying,Tianlei, AU - Xie,Youhua, AU - Lu,Lu, AU - Yuan,Zhenghong, AU - Jiang,Shibo, Y1 - 2020/11/27/ PY - 2020/09/17/received PY - 2020/10/27/accepted PY - 2020/10/22/revised PY - 2020/11/28/entrez PY - 2020/11/29/pubmed PY - 2020/12/29/medline SP - 282 EP - 282 JF - Signal transduction and targeted therapy JO - Signal Transduct Target Ther VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has posed serious threats to global health and economy, thus calling for the development of safe and effective vaccines. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for its binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. It contains multiple dominant neutralizing epitopes and serves as an important antigen for the development of COVID-19 vaccines. Here, we showed that immunization of mice with a candidate subunit vaccine consisting of SARS-CoV-2 RBD and Fc fragment of human IgG, as an immunopotentiator, elicited high titer of RBD-specific antibodies with robust neutralizing activity against both pseudotyped and live SARS-CoV-2 infections. The mouse antisera could also effectively neutralize infection by pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 with several natural mutations in RBD and the IgG extracted from the mouse antisera could also show neutralization against pseudotyped SARS-CoV and SARS-related coronavirus (SARSr-CoV). Vaccination of human ACE2 transgenic mice with RBD-Fc could effectively protect mice from the SARS-CoV-2 challenge. These results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 RBD-Fc has good potential to be further developed as an effective and broad-spectrum vaccine to prevent infection of the current SARS-CoV-2 and its mutants, as well as future emerging SARSr-CoVs and re-emerging SARS-CoV. SN - 2059-3635 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33247109/RBD_Fc_based_COVID_19_vaccine_candidate_induces_highly_potent_SARS_CoV_2_neutralizing_antibody_response_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41392-020-00402-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -