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Clinical features of recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis.
Pediatr Dermatol. 2021 Jan; 38(1):154-158.PD

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

The characteristics of patients experiencing recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis (MIRM) are not well understood. We aimed to characterize patients with recurrent disease by comparing the demographics, skin and mucosal involvement, seasonality, and treatment to those with single episodes (isolated MIRM).

METHODS

This retrospective case series screened all patients seen by our dermatology inpatient consult service from September 2014 to March 2020. Cases were selected based on laboratory and clinical criteria that confirmed a diagnosis of MIRM.

RESULTS

We identified 13 patients with MIRM: 5 who experienced recurrence (38%) and 8 with isolated, single episodes without recurrence. Mean age was 13.6 years for initial episodes in the recurrent patients compared to 11.7 in patients with isolated episodes. All 5 recurrent MIRM patients were male (compared with 75% of isolated MIRM patients) and predominantly Black (60%, compared with 25%). Most episodes overall (isolated and recurrent) occurred from the months of October to February. Recurrences after initial MIRM episode had less severe skin and mucosal findings, often involving only one mucous membrane, less frequent need for hospital admission, and shorter duration of hospital stay. Prophylactic treatments and treatments beyond supportive care were of unclear value.

CONCLUSIONS

Some characteristics of MIRM differ between patients with recurrent and isolated disease. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for recurrence, which occurred in 38% of our cohort. Although recurrences after initial MIRM episode tended to be less severe, there is still potential for prolonged hospitalizations with recurrent episodes. More evidence is needed regarding effective preventive and treatment regimens in patients with recurrent MIRM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, NY, USA.Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, NY, USA.Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33247484

Citation

Liakos, William, et al. "Clinical Features of Recurrent Mycoplasma Pneumoniae-induced Rash and Mucositis." Pediatric Dermatology, vol. 38, no. 1, 2021, pp. 154-158.
Liakos W, Xu A, Finelt N. Clinical features of recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis. Pediatr Dermatol. 2021;38(1):154-158.
Liakos, W., Xu, A., & Finelt, N. (2021). Clinical features of recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis. Pediatric Dermatology, 38(1), 154-158. https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.14472
Liakos W, Xu A, Finelt N. Clinical Features of Recurrent Mycoplasma Pneumoniae-induced Rash and Mucositis. Pediatr Dermatol. 2021;38(1):154-158. PubMed PMID: 33247484.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical features of recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis. AU - Liakos,William, AU - Xu,Amy, AU - Finelt,Nika, Y1 - 2020/11/28/ PY - 2020/11/29/pubmed PY - 2021/5/15/medline PY - 2020/11/28/entrez KW - MIRM KW - RIME KW - mycoplasma pneumoniae KW - mycoplasma-induced rash and mucositis KW - pediatric mucositis KW - reactive infectious mucocutaneous eruption SP - 154 EP - 158 JF - Pediatric dermatology JO - Pediatr Dermatol VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The characteristics of patients experiencing recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis (MIRM) are not well understood. We aimed to characterize patients with recurrent disease by comparing the demographics, skin and mucosal involvement, seasonality, and treatment to those with single episodes (isolated MIRM). METHODS: This retrospective case series screened all patients seen by our dermatology inpatient consult service from September 2014 to March 2020. Cases were selected based on laboratory and clinical criteria that confirmed a diagnosis of MIRM. RESULTS: We identified 13 patients with MIRM: 5 who experienced recurrence (38%) and 8 with isolated, single episodes without recurrence. Mean age was 13.6 years for initial episodes in the recurrent patients compared to 11.7 in patients with isolated episodes. All 5 recurrent MIRM patients were male (compared with 75% of isolated MIRM patients) and predominantly Black (60%, compared with 25%). Most episodes overall (isolated and recurrent) occurred from the months of October to February. Recurrences after initial MIRM episode had less severe skin and mucosal findings, often involving only one mucous membrane, less frequent need for hospital admission, and shorter duration of hospital stay. Prophylactic treatments and treatments beyond supportive care were of unclear value. CONCLUSIONS: Some characteristics of MIRM differ between patients with recurrent and isolated disease. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for recurrence, which occurred in 38% of our cohort. Although recurrences after initial MIRM episode tended to be less severe, there is still potential for prolonged hospitalizations with recurrent episodes. More evidence is needed regarding effective preventive and treatment regimens in patients with recurrent MIRM. SN - 1525-1470 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33247484/Clinical_features_of_recurrent_Mycoplasma_pneumoniae_induced_rash_and_mucositis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.14472 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -